Trump 2024
Jon Stewart courtesy Apple TV // Donald Trump by Gage Skidmore

Jon Stewart says Trump could be re-elected in 2024.

"I think he's got it—he's got a very good chance," said the former host of "The Daily Show" in a recent interview.

Jon Stewart has recently been resurfacing after the announcement of his new Apple TV+ series, "The Problem With Jon Stewart," where once again viewers can enjoy his witty, pointed and relentless criticism on social topics.

For the 22nd annual New Yorker festival, Stewart spoke with David Remnick, who asked for Jon's hot takes on all the feel good talking points. You know, cancel culture, the COVID pandemic and, of course, Trump's chances of winning a 2024 presidential race.

Jon spared no punches. And the reasons behind his theory are compelling.

Regarding the how the Republican party would handle their 2024 strategy, Stewart remarked:

"They're smarter about it … what I think they really learned from this exercise was there are really specific pivot points within the American electoral system, and those pivot points are generally the administration of elections run by partisans, but not ideologues … a lot of the real mechanics and logistics of elections are run by Democrats or Republicans, partisans, but they are administrative positions. If he can replace the administrative functionaries with ideologues, he's removed almost all of the guard rails."




Jon Stewart on Trump, cancel culture and optimism | The New Yorker Festival www.youtube.com

In other words, replacing appointed positions with speculators could enable an "early-stage minority rule," and therefore a right-wing led administration, as Stewart sees it. Sort of like what we're seeing in Texas with the abortion ban, with deputized civilians having the authority to enact legal action, only on a much larger scale.

As for Trump himself, Jon noted, "He's brilliant at understanding what will drive the television narratives." He went on to explain how the violent mob of Trump supporters storming the U.S Capitol on January 6 resembled a "TV event moment."

"It's the special that came out. And that's what all the TV networks were focused on," he warned, saying that the real "danger is that it exposed a fragility at a level that is not flashy, or sexy, or known."

According to an article posted by The Hill, Stewart thinks that the very qualities that should disqualify Trump, like inciting the Capitol riot, for instance, are the very points of attraction for his supporters. "He came at the right moment for that audience with the right message, and unapologetic," said Stewart, adding, "and if nothing else, the dude's resilient."

The Hill quoted that Stewart also predicted that the main theme of Trump's 2024 election campaign would focus on his "Stop the Steal" message. Though Trump has not officially declared candidacy, it feels all too inevitable.

But hey, maybe Trump's supporters will follow his recent advice not to vote in 2022 and 2024, and this will all be a thing of the past. I somehow think that won't be the case. After all, this won't be the first Jon Stewart prediction to have come true.

One thing's for sure: the possibility of Trump's reelection marks a continued and deepening divide among the American people as to exactly who should be in power. Elected officials? Civilian vigilantes? Realty TV stars? Celebrity activists? Internet speculators? It has the entire country rethinking exactly what democracy is, and whether or not we ever had it in the first place. I mean, we can't even seem to come to agreement on anything nowadays. We can't even reach consensus reality on the existence of a pandemic, for Pete's sake.

Although the prediction is unsettling, it's a small comfort to once again bask in the brilliant, sardonic candor of Jon Stewart. At the very least, he makes even the most alarming news entertaining.

via USO

Army Capt. Justin Meredith used the Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program to read to his son and family while deployed in the Middle East.

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One of the biggest challenges deployed service members face is the feeling of being separated from their families, especially when they have children. It's also very stressful for children to be away from parents who are deployed for long periods of time.

For the past four years, the USO has brought deployed service members and their families closer through a wonderful program that allows them to read together. The Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program gives deployed service members the ability to choose a book, read it on camera, then send both the recording and book to their child.

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Jimmy Fallon #MyFamilyIsWeird.

It’s that time of year again, the holiday season is when we get the pleasure of spending way more time than we’re used to with our families. For those of us who’ve moved away from our immediate families, the holidays are a great time to reacquaint ourselves with old traditions and to realize that some of them may be a little strange.

Every family seems to have its own brand of weirdness. In fact, I wouldn’t trust anyone who says that their family is completely normal.

On November 18, “The Tonight Show” host Jimmy Fallon gave everyone a reason to celebrate their unique families by asking them to share their favorite stories under #MyFamilyIsWeird. The responses were everything from odd holiday traditions to family members that may have a screw (or two!) loose.

Here are 17 of the funniest responses.

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Representative Nancy Mace on Fox News and CNN

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On Fox’s “Sunday Morning Futures,” Mace made some misleading and dangerous statements about why “natural immunity” is better than immunity provided by vaccines.

“One thing the CDC and no policy maker at the federal level has done so far is take into account what natural immunity has done,” Mace said. “That may be what we’re seeing in Florida today. In some studies that I have read, natural immunity gives you 27 times more protection against future COVID infection than vaccination. We need to take all of the science into account and not selectively choosing what science to follow when we are making policy decisions.”

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Cayce LaCorte explains why virginity doesn't exist.

The concept of virginity is a very loaded issue in American culture. If a woman loses hers when she's too young she can be slut-shamed. If a man remains a virgin for too long, he can be bullied for not being manly enough.

There is also a whole slew of religious mind games associated with virginity that can give people some serious psychological problems associated with sex.

Losing one's virginity has also been blown up way beyond proportion. It's often believed that it's a magical experience—it's usually not. Or that after having sex for the first time people can really start to enjoy living life—not the case.

What if we just dropped all of the stigmas surrounding virginity and instead, replaced them with healthy attitudes toward sex and relationships?

Writer Cayce LaCorte is going viral on TikTok for the simple way she's taught her five daughters to think about virginity. They don't have to. LaCorte shared her parenting ideas on TikTok in response to mom-influencer Nevada Shareef's question: "Name something about the way you raised your kids that people think is weird but you think is healthy."

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