Trump 2024
Jon Stewart courtesy Apple TV // Donald Trump by Gage Skidmore

Jon Stewart says Trump could be re-elected in 2024.

"I think he's got it—he's got a very good chance," said the former host of "The Daily Show" in a recent interview.

Jon Stewart has recently been resurfacing after the announcement of his new Apple TV+ series, "The Problem With Jon Stewart," where once again viewers can enjoy his witty, pointed and relentless criticism on social topics.

For the 22nd annual New Yorker festival, Stewart spoke with David Remnick, who asked for Jon's hot takes on all the feel good talking points. You know, cancel culture, the COVID pandemic and, of course, Trump's chances of winning a 2024 presidential race.

Jon spared no punches. And the reasons behind his theory are compelling.

Regarding the how the Republican party would handle their 2024 strategy, Stewart remarked:

"They're smarter about it … what I think they really learned from this exercise was there are really specific pivot points within the American electoral system, and those pivot points are generally the administration of elections run by partisans, but not ideologues … a lot of the real mechanics and logistics of elections are run by Democrats or Republicans, partisans, but they are administrative positions. If he can replace the administrative functionaries with ideologues, he's removed almost all of the guard rails."




Jon Stewart on Trump, cancel culture and optimism | The New Yorker Festival www.youtube.com

In other words, replacing appointed positions with speculators could enable an "early-stage minority rule," and therefore a right-wing led administration, as Stewart sees it. Sort of like what we're seeing in Texas with the abortion ban, with deputized civilians having the authority to enact legal action, only on a much larger scale.

As for Trump himself, Jon noted, "He's brilliant at understanding what will drive the television narratives." He went on to explain how the violent mob of Trump supporters storming the U.S Capitol on January 6 resembled a "TV event moment."

"It's the special that came out. And that's what all the TV networks were focused on," he warned, saying that the real "danger is that it exposed a fragility at a level that is not flashy, or sexy, or known."

According to an article posted by The Hill, Stewart thinks that the very qualities that should disqualify Trump, like inciting the Capitol riot, for instance, are the very points of attraction for his supporters. "He came at the right moment for that audience with the right message, and unapologetic," said Stewart, adding, "and if nothing else, the dude's resilient."

The Hill quoted that Stewart also predicted that the main theme of Trump's 2024 election campaign would focus on his "Stop the Steal" message. Though Trump has not officially declared candidacy, it feels all too inevitable.

But hey, maybe Trump's supporters will follow his recent advice not to vote in 2022 and 2024, and this will all be a thing of the past. I somehow think that won't be the case. After all, this won't be the first Jon Stewart prediction to have come true.

One thing's for sure: the possibility of Trump's reelection marks a continued and deepening divide among the American people as to exactly who should be in power. Elected officials? Civilian vigilantes? Realty TV stars? Celebrity activists? Internet speculators? It has the entire country rethinking exactly what democracy is, and whether or not we ever had it in the first place. I mean, we can't even seem to come to agreement on anything nowadays. We can't even reach consensus reality on the existence of a pandemic, for Pete's sake.

Although the prediction is unsettling, it's a small comfort to once again bask in the brilliant, sardonic candor of Jon Stewart. At the very least, he makes even the most alarming news entertaining.

Joy

Meet Eva, the hero dog who risked her life saving her owner from a mountain lion

Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva when a mountain lion suddenly appeared.

Photo by Didssph on Unsplash

A sweet face and fierce loyalty: Belgian Malinois defends owner.

The Belgian Malinois is a special breed of dog. It's highly intelligent, extremely athletic and needs a ton of interaction. While these attributes make the Belgian Malinois the perfect dog for police and military work, they can be a bit of a handful as a typical pet.

As Belgian Malinois owner Erin Wilson jokingly told NPR, they’re basically "a German shepherd on steroids or crack or cocaine.”

It was her Malinois Eva’s natural drive, however, that ended up saving Wilson’s life.

According to a news release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva slightly ahead of her when a mountain lion suddenly appeared and swiped Wilson across the left shoulder. She quickly yelled Eva’s name and the dog’s instincts kicked in immediately. Eva rushed in to defend her owner.

It wasn’t long, though, before the mountain lion won the upper hand, much to Wilson’s horror.

She told TODAY, “They fought for a couple seconds, and then I heard her start crying. That’s when the cat latched on to her skull.”

Keep Reading Show less

Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy asked his Senate colleagues the questions millions of Americans have after a mass shooting.

Another school shooting. Another mass murder of innocent children. They were elementary school kids this time. There were 18 children killed—so far—this time.

The fact that I can say "this time" is enraging, but that's the routine nature of mass shootings in the U.S. It happened in Texas this time. At least three adults were killed this time. The shooter was a teenager this time.

The details this time may be different than the last time and the time before that, and the time before that, and the time before that. But there's one thing all mass shootings have in common. No, it's not mental illness. It's not racism or misogyny or religious extremism. It's not bad parenting or violent video games or lack of religion.

Some of those things have been factors in some shootings, but the single common denominator in every mass shooting is guns. That's not a secret. It's not controversial. It's fact. The only thing all mass shootings have in common is guns.

Keep Reading Show less
Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


Keep Reading Show less