via The Epidemic / YouTube

There are few people on planet Earth that know what it feels like to be bullied quite like Monica Lewinsky.

In her early 20s, she became the focus of one of the biggest scandals in American history after engaging in a sexual relationship with former president Bill Clinton.

She was the butt of nighttime talk show jokes, harassed by politicians, and constantly pursued by the paparazzi. Twenty years later, she's survived the scandal and become a tireless advocate for helping those who've been bullied.


via White House Photograph Office / Wikimedia Commons

Given her experience with harassment, she saw it as time to "stick my head above the parapet so that I can take back my narrative and give a purpose to my past."

Being that the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal was at the onset of the internet-era she considered herself, "patient zero" of online harassment.

RELATED: Hillary Clinton was asked if Bill Clinton 'abused' Monica Lewinsky. Her response has ignited an important debate.

A 2018 report by Pew Research Center found that 59% of U.S. teens have been bullied or harassed online. "The bullying crisis has become a global epidemic," Lewinsky said on the TODAY show.

"It can be hard to see the signs of when someone's going through this and then, even worse than all of that is the fact that this behavior, with cyber-bullying, even though it takes place online, there are offline consequences, and these consequences can range from bad to grave," Lewisnky continued.

via Wikimedia Commons

To help spread awareness about the hidden evils of cyberbullying, she's partnered with The Epidemic to create a new interactive PSA that gives viewers an inside look at how this modern form harassment feels.

The campaign begins with an online video about a mystery illness affecting a teenager named Haley. "You see and feel firsthand how awful and devastating these messages can be," Lewinsky said.

Eventually, this illness leads her to overdose on pills.

At the end of the video, viewer are invited to share their phone numbers and are sent a link to the video. But this time it's accompanied by a barrage of text messages that give one a first-hand experience of how relentless and debilitating cyberbullying can be.

via The Epidemic


via The Epidemic


via The Epidemic


via The Epidemic


via The Epidemic

Cyberbullying is often mischaracterized as less harmful than face-to-face bullying. But it can be relentless and just as damaging psychologically. Cyberbullying can happen at any time, day or night and is impossible to escape.

This video is a powerful wake-up call to parents and teachers to show them just how painful and relentless this form of harassment can be.

To get help for cyberbullying, visit the Crisis text Line.

via Jeremy Hogan / YouTube

Vauhxx Booker, a civil rights activist from Bloomington, Indiana, claims that a group of white men threatened to lynch him during an altercation on July 4 near Lake Monroe, but he was saved by onlookers who intervened.

Video taken during the incident shows he was held down by a group of men who pinned him to a tree in a wooded area. Booker says that while he was being held down, the men threatened to break his arms, repeatedly said "get a noose," and told his friends to leave the area.

The men later let him go after being confronted by onlookers who gathered at the scene.

The incident began, according to Booker, when he and his friends were making their way to the lake to see the lunar eclipse when a white man on an ATV told them they were trespassing. When Booker and his friends continued to walk to the lake, the man on the ATV and his friends allegedly shouted "white power" at them, which is when things turned violent.

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