The White House made a propaganda video about the protests that might as well be from another planet

When I wrote about President Trump's walk to St. John's church to hold up a Bible—utilizing police violence against citizens peacefully protesting police violence to clear his path to get there—I thought it was just a bizarre stunt for pictures.

I had no idea the White House was making a propaganda film from it.

It's silly to be surprised at this point, I know. But watching this video made my jaw drop. I have so many questions. Like, why is there not a single word, spoken or written? What exactly is this supposed to convey? Are there any people of color in it? Who chose the triumphant movie trailer music? Is this a parody video? Are we living in North Korea?

Watch for yourself, then check out the video below that shows the reality behind the scenes.


The fact that the president thinks this video makes him look like a strong leader is an indication of how completely out of touch he is. But the fact that he made it while horrendously violating his own citizens' first amendment rights is stark visual proof that he's completely disconnected from both the reality before him and the responsibility he bears as the leader of our nation in a time of crisis.

A video compilation called "Trump vs. Reality" shared by Reddit user Mister T12, shows scenes from Trump's propaganda video cut with scenes from the violent dispersing of protesters and physical attacks on members of the press that had occurred just minutes before his walk to the church. The contrast could not be more striking.

Trump Ad vs Reality www.youtube.com

Anyone who can watch this and not see the problem has some seriously thick blinders on. The emperor has no clothes and we've reached a new level of absurdity and horror that's hard to fathom.

We have a president who went to enormous lengths to be filmed walking outside the White House because his ego was bruised when people made fun of him for hiding in his bunker. We have a president who claims to love America while allowing Americans to be violently manhandled during a peaceful protest so he can create an image of himself. We have a president who claims to love the Constitution but doesn't allow citizens the right for peaceable assembly. We have a president who claims to be a Christian holding up a Bible in front of a church but saying no prayer and offering no faith-based message.

We have a president who has only fanned the flames in the largest unrest we've seen in decades. Is this what great looks like? Because if it is, I'd like to go back to halfway decent, please.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
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