via Lis Power / Twitter

There are too many differences between Barack Obama and Donald Trump to list them all. But a recent Trump controversy exemplifies how the two differ in their basic humanity.

On Tuesday, a chilling report in The New York Times showed just how far Trump is willing to go to secure the U.S.-Mexico border.

In a March meeting, Trump was fuming about undocumented immigrants crossing the border so he proposed some ideas that are so extreme they seemed to come from the Middle Ages.

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The New York Times just dug into its copious archives, turning up an unpublished letter from Amelia Earhart, calling out the paper for some vintage sexist headlines.

Don't mess. Photo via Hulton Archive.

After her marriage in 1931, the Times began referring to Earhart, jarringly, as "Mrs. Putnam" after her husband, George Palmer Putnam.

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A mental health professional makes a strong argument against diagnosing Trump.

'Bad behavior is rarely a sign of mental illness, and the mentally ill behave badly only rarely.'

Donald Trump is a narcissist and everybody knows it — at least in the colloquial sense of the term.

The 45th president of the United States built his brand on being self-absorbed, self-obsessed. He's the type of man who's spent the better part of the past several decades living in a gold tower with his name emblazoned on the outside. He's put his name on everything from steaks to board games to vodka. He's a real-life Narcissus, gazing into his own reflection. He is pride, he is arrogance, he is vanity.

To untrained observers, he's the embodiment of narcissistic personality disorder. And yet, at least one man thinks that we're not giving Trump enough credit — and he's perhaps one of the most qualified people to make that assessment.

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