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"What Do You Know About The Female Body?" from Jimmy Kimmel

When Jimmy Kimmel takes to the street, you know you’re in for a good laugh at just how little we actually know about, well, seemingly anything. That goes for anatomy too. In this case, female anatomy.

In a segment called “What Do You Know About The Female Body?” men try—and hilariously fail—to answer even the most basic questions, like “does a female have one uterus, or two?” much to the amazement of some of their female partners.

Here are some of the very best bits of nonwisdom:


Woman have LOTS of fallopian tubes and ovaries, apparently.

When asked, “how many fallopian tubes does the average lady have?” one man prefaced with “I know I’m gonna be way off,” before answering “four.”

He was right about being way off, indeed. Women usually have one fallopian tube on either side of the uterus, making that two fallopian tubes.

Another guy guessed that a woman has not one, not two, but six ovaries. Which, in case you didn’t know, is three times more than the correct answer (two ovaries, one on either side of the uterus). Where would a woman keep four extra ovaries? Her purse?

A mammogram examines the stomach.

The interviewer also asked: “What part of the body does the mammogram examine?"

"The lower half…" replied one man. Yikes.

And when asked to demonstrate where exactly the “lower half” is, he gestured toward the uppermost part of his belly, seemingly avoiding the actual area a mammogram covers entirely.

PMS is all in the mind, but only annually.

The next question up was “What does PMS stand for?"

One man shyly answered, “Post…mental…syndrome?”

One outta three ain’t bad. But the correct answer is premenstrual syndrome.

And it definitely happens more than “once a year.”

An IUD is a “mammogram device.”

Oh, and a NuvaRing is a “pap schmear,” and a speculum is the actual “IUD.” Holy moly, if you thought IUDs were uncomfortable before…

Things really took a turn once the graphics came out.

And men were asked to point to where the cervix is. Plenty of things were pointed at—like the uterus. But sadly, no cervix findings.

Changing gears, the interview instructed the men to “point at something you know.”

To which one man replied (inaccurately) “uh…that’s a baby?”

Unless the woman is giving birth to a colon, that was incorrect.

Later in the video, a man is asked “where does the baby go?”

“In there,” the man answers after pointing to the ovaries. (Spoiler alert: It doesn’t go there. A fetus grows in the uterus, which this man thought was the cervix.)

His wife, a gynecologist no less, chuckled “I’m mortified…I’m apparently not a very good educator at home for my husband.”

Though this is just for pure fun, it is food for thought.

A woman’s autonomy over her own body has been the subject of much controversial discussion lately. And I can’t help but wonder how certain politicians/leaders would fare if given the same questions. Perhaps it is unwise to try to govern that which is not fully understood, just saying.


This article originally appeared on 01.14.22

To bake or not to bake? That was the question posed by a same-gender wedding cake case in California.

Last year, Cathy Miller, the owner of Tastries Bakery in Bakersfield, refused to bake a wedding cake for a lesbian couple. The couple, wanting to be treated as human beings and all, took issue with that. They took Miller to court.

On Feb. 6, 2018, however, Kern County Supreme Court Judge David Lampe ruled on a preliminary injunction that because the couple's proposed cake had yet to be baked, Miller's artistic expression was protected by the First Amendment.


That is:Her Christian faith protected her from having to bake a cake for an LGBTQ couple. Had the cake already been prepared and on display to the public, the judge noted, Miller would have had to sell them the cake.

Makes sense, right? Not to Jimmy Kimmel.

Despite admitting the judge's ruling "sounded reasonable at first," the "Jimmy Kimmel Live" host hilariously blasted Lampe's decision using an ordinary dining experience to make his case.

Check out the sketch (story continues below):

In the sketch, Kimmel, playing a server, rules out menu items for guests at his table based on the various attitudes of those preparing the food.

"Does anyone have any food allergies? Any dietary restrictions?" Kimmel asks, as the guests shake their heads. "Are any of you gay?"

"I'm gay," one woman responds.

"OK. You won't be enjoying any of our signature salads tonight," Kimmel says, to laughs. "Our salad chef today is Tony, and he believes homosexuality is a sin, so he won't be creating any of our salads for you."

From a legal perspective, there’s an important difference between simply selling a cake to the general public and creating one for a specific wedding event, the judge argued.

But isn’t that a murky distinction? What’s stopping Tony from deeming his salad a work of art expressing his support for a gay guest at the restaurant?

If Tony's salad had been pre-made, however, that'd apparently suffice.

[rebelmouse-image 19529270 dam="1" original_size="500x254" caption="GIF via "Jimmy Kimmel Live"/YouTube." expand=1]GIF via "Jimmy Kimmel Live"/YouTube.

"I don't want day-old salad," the guest protests.

To which Kimmel retorts, "Well, aren't you a picky lesbian."

That's not the end of it, though. A Jewish guest is denied lasagna because the cook preparing it is antisemitic. Another guest can't order steak because a chef is Hindu.

When a man orders a salad, intending to give it to the lesbian couple and  circumvent the discriminatory rule, Kimmel's character shuts him down. "Our owner Patricia is a Wiccan priestess," he explains, "and she won't allow men to order for women. She says it perpetuates the patriarchy."

When can one person's religious liberty veer off into blatant discrimination? As Kimmel's sketch suggests, pretty darn quickly.

Jimmy Kimmel wanted to know what kids thought about President Donald Trump's first year in office. So he asked.

"Trump's approval ratings, according to the polls that were released today, is at 37%, which isn't great," the host of "Jimmy Kimmel Live" explained in a segment that aired Jan. 18, 2018. "But that was a poll of adults. I wanted to see what kids thought of his first year in office."

The show sent a correspondent out on the streets to get kids' thoughts on the matter. And hilarity ensued:



Some of the kids' answers were just flat-out hilarious.

"What's the first thing you think of when I say Donald Trump?" the correspondent asked a boy. "Small fingers," he answered.

"Donald Trump has a lot of nicknames for people like 'Crooked Hillary' or 'Rocket Man.' Do you have a nickname for him?" another girl was asked. She quipped:




GIF via Jimmy Kimmel Live/YouTube.

But other responses hinted at deeper truths — even if they were still worth a chuckle.

"He wants to put a wall over Mexico," one kid noted when asked if Trump has done a good job in his first year. "And I, like, love going to Mexico."

"I think he needs to stop threatening North Korea," another kid said. "I don't want to get nuked."

The segment was clearly intended to be a lighthearted jab at Trump. But it's worth noting how profoundly Trump has affected our kids.

"It's hard to be a parent tonight for a lot of us," CNN's Van Jones said the night of the 2016 election. "You tell your kids don't be a bully. You tell your kids don't be a bigot. You tell your kids do your homework and be prepared. And then you have this outcome."

Some parents have found ways to navigate these difficult conversations and help their young ones if they're feeling confused or anxious; like encouraging them to draw out their feelings, for example, or explain to them how our electoral college system works, so kids can feel empowered with information.

Still, it's tough.  

"You have people putting children to bed tonight, and they're afraid of breakfast," Jones said on election night. "They're afraid of, 'How do I explain this to my children?'"

A report by BuzzFeed News published last summer found students across the country were using Trump's taunts to bully their classmates, often resorting to racially charged rhetoric targeting non-white kids.

Plus, a survey released in October 2017 by UCLA noted that school teachers reported they'd noticed more students experiencing anxiety over the current political climate in this new "age of Trump," according to NPR.

Our kids are listening.

"Do you think he's smart?" the "Jimmy Kimmel Live" correspondent asked one girl. "No," she responded. "He treats people badly, and that's why I don't think he's smart."

More

Jimmy Kimmel thanks hospitals for saving his son, slams Trump in teary opener.

The late-night TV host's story might change how you think about our health care system.

His voice breaking and tears welling up in his eyes, Jimmy Kimmel delivered the most compelling 13-minute monologue of his career.

"I have a story to tell about something that happened to our family last week," he said at the top of his show on May 1, 2017. "Before I go into it, I want you to know it has a happy ending."

On April 21, his wife gave birth to a baby boy, William John Kimmel. Three hours later, an attentive nurse noticed the infant wasn't as healthy as he had seemed before. Three days later, Kimmel's newborn son underwent surgery to repair a congenital heart condition.


Images via Jimmy Kimmel Live/YouTube.

The most powerful and poignant part of Kimmel's monologue comes at the end.

"We were brought up to believe that we live in the greatest country in the world," Kimmel said, choking back tears about 10 minutes into the clip.

"But until a few years ago, millions and millions of us had no access to health insurance at all. You know, before 2014, if you were born with congenital heart disease, like my son was, there’s a good chance you’d never be able to get health insurance because you had a pre-existing condition."

Kimmel is a millionaire many, many times over, and as such, he can afford just about any medical treatment in existence. But whether or not a newborn baby deserves to live shouldn't hinge on that baby's parent's paycheck.

"If your baby is going to die and it doesn’t have to, it shouldn’t matter how much money you make. I think that’s something that whether you’re a Republican or a Democrat or something else, we all agree on that, right?"

Kimmel continued,

"We need to make sure that the people who represent us and people are meeting about this right now in Washington understand that very clearly. Let’s stop with the nonsense. This isn’t football. There are no teams. We are the team. It’s the United States. Don’t let their partisan squabbles divide us on something every decent person wants."

"We need to take care of each other," he concluded. "No parent should ever have to decide if they can afford to save their child’s life. It just shouldn’t happen. Not here."

As Congress considers a major health care overhaul that could leave those like Kimmel's son vulnerable, his emotional message has the power to change everything.

"We need to take care of each other. No parent should ever have to decide if they can afford to save their child’s life. It just shouldn’t happen. Not here."

As Kimmel said through tears, this isn't about him or his son, but those less financially fortunate. It's a truly must-watch piece of TV.