This Jimmy Kimmel sketch shows how absurd the gay wedding cake drama truly is.

To bake or not to bake? That was the question posed by a same-gender wedding cake case in California.

Last year, Cathy Miller, the owner of Tastries Bakery in Bakersfield, refused to bake a wedding cake for a lesbian couple. The couple, wanting to be treated as human beings and all, took issue with that. They took Miller to court.

On Feb. 6, 2018, however, Kern County Supreme Court Judge David Lampe ruled on a preliminary injunction that because the couple's proposed cake had yet to be baked, Miller's artistic expression was protected by the First Amendment.


That is: Her Christian faith protected her from having to bake a cake for an LGBTQ couple. Had the cake already been prepared and on display to the public, the judge noted, Miller would have had to sell them the cake.

Makes sense, right? Not to Jimmy Kimmel.

Despite admitting the judge's ruling "sounded reasonable at first," the "Jimmy Kimmel Live" host hilariously blasted Lampe's decision using an ordinary dining experience to make his case.

Check out the sketch (story continues below):

In the sketch, Kimmel, playing a server, rules out menu items for guests at his table based on the various attitudes of those preparing the food.

"Does anyone have any food allergies? Any dietary restrictions?" Kimmel asks, as the guests shake their heads. "Are any of you gay?"

"I'm gay," one woman responds.

"OK. You won't be enjoying any of our signature salads tonight," Kimmel says, to laughs. "Our salad chef today is Tony, and he believes homosexuality is a sin, so he won't be creating any of our salads for you."

From a legal perspective, there’s an important difference between simply selling a cake to the general public and creating one for a specific wedding event, the judge argued.

But isn’t that a murky distinction? What’s stopping Tony from deeming his salad a work of art expressing his support for a gay guest at the restaurant?

If Tony's salad had been pre-made, however, that'd apparently suffice.

GIF via "Jimmy Kimmel Live"/YouTube.

"I don't want day-old salad," the guest protests.

To which Kimmel retorts, "Well, aren't you a picky lesbian."

That's not the end of it, though. A Jewish guest is denied lasagna because the cook preparing it is antisemitic. Another guest can't order steak because a chef is Hindu.

When a man orders a salad, intending to give it to the lesbian couple and  circumvent the discriminatory rule, Kimmel's character shuts him down. "Our owner Patricia is a Wiccan priestess," he explains, "and she won't allow men to order for women. She says it perpetuates the patriarchy."

When can one person's religious liberty veer off into blatant discrimination? As Kimmel's sketch suggests, pretty darn quickly.

More
LUSH

Handmade cosmetics company Lush is putting its money where its mouth is and taking a bold step for climate change action.

On September 20 in the U.S. and September 27 in Canada, Lush will shut the doors of its 250 shops, e-commerce sites, manufacturing facilities, and headquarters for a day, in solidarity with the Global Climate Strike taking place around the world. Lush is encouraging its 5000+ employees "to join this critical movement and take a stand until global leaders are forced to face the climate crisis and enact change."

Keep Reading Show less
Planet
Photo by Annie Bolin on Unsplash

Recent tragic mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton have sparked a lot of conversation and action on the state level over the issue of gun control. But none may be as encouraging as the most recent one, in which 145 CEOs signed a letter urging the U.S. Senate to take action at their level.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

The fine folks at Forbes are currently falling all over themselves trying to clean up the mess they created by publishing their 2019 list of 100 Most Innovative Leaders.

The problem: The list included 99 men and one woman. For those not so good with the math, that means according to Forbes, only 1% of the country's most innovative leaders are female.

Have you ever watched a movie that's so abysmally bad that you wonder how it ever even got made? Where you think, "Hundreds and hundreds of people had to have been directly involved in the production of this film. Did any of them ever think to say, 'Hey, maybe we should just scrap this idea altogether?"

That's how it feels to see a list like this. So how did Forbes come up with these results?

Keep Reading Show less
Innovation

There's something delicious and addicting about those trendy recipe videos circulating online. You've seen them before: the quick and beautiful play-by-plays of mouthwatering dishes you wish you were eating at this very moment.

The recipes seem so simple and magical and get you thinking, "Maybe I can make that five-cheese bacon lasagna tonight." And before you know it, you're at the store loading up on Colby-Monterey Jack (or is that just me?).

For some families, though, the ingredients and final product look a little different. As part of Hunger Action Month, the hunger-relief organization Feeding America is using our obsession with cooking videos to highlight the reality many food-insecure families face when they sit down for dinner: hunger, and no food in sight.

By putting a twist on the bite-sized food videos all over the internet, they hope to raise awareness that hunger is an unacceptable reality for too many families.

Keep Reading Show less
Family
True
Gates Foundation: The Story of Food