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argentina

Joy

Andrés Cantor waited decades to make this World Cup call. He brought everyone to tears.

The Argentine-American sportscaster's emotional response to his home country's win won everyone's hearts.

Photo by Rhett Lewis on Unsplash

Andrés Cantor finally got to call the World Cup win for Argentina.

If you didn't watch the 2022 World Cup final, you missed a historic event. I'm not even a soccer fan and I was sweating long before it was over. It was truly a riveting game.

First, a brief synopsis. At the end of regular time, France and Argentina were tied 2-2. After two harrowing 15-minute overtimes, they were still tied, at 3-3.

Only two other World Cup finals in history have still been tied after two overtimes, in 1994 and 2006. The game then came down to a penalty kick shootout, in which five players from each team faced off one-on-one with the goalkeepers. France missed two of their first four kicks, so when Argentina's Gonzalo Montiel successfully kicked the fourth goal, the Argentine team walked away the victors.

But there was more that made this game historic. France won the last World Cup in 2018, so if they triumphed this year, they'd be only the third team in history to win back-to-back titles. However, Argentina has Lionel Messi, who has played professional soccer for 18 years and has long been seen as one of the best players of all time but had never won a World Cup. In a career full of championship wins and records, the World Cup title was the only major soccer achievement he had yet to accomplish.

And, to make the match-up even more interesting, France's star player, Kylian Mbappé, is viewed as the next Lionel Messi, so there was the old guard versus new guard element to this game as well.


It was a World Cup fraught with significant players, but there was one more person to watch—Argentine-American sports announcer Andrés Cantor.

Cantor moved to the U.S. from Buenos Aires, Argentina, when he was a teen and has citizenship in both countries. He watched Argentina win the World Cup in 1978 and in 1986 before he started announcing the global event in 1990. Since then, 59-year-old Cantor has become famous for his sports commentary on Telemundo and his epically long "Gooooooooooooal!" when a player scores. He has also had to call two losing World Cup finals for his home country of Argentina, in 1990 and 2014.

Soccer is popular in a lot of countries, but it's particularly huge in Argentina. If you want to feel the emotion of an entire country wrapped up in one man, look no further than Andrés Cantor making the call as Argentina scored the knockout goal:

English translation courtesy of Sports Illustrated:

“GOOOOOOAL, Argentina is the champion. Argentina is the world champion. ARGENTINA IS THE WORLD CHAMPION! ARGENTINA IS THE WORLD CHAMPION! ARGENTINA IS THE WORLD CHAMPION! Argentina! Is the world champion! From the sky they did it. You guys did it, players. They won the sky. Argentina is the world champion. Messi is the world champion. It couldn't be any other way. Argentina. Lionel Scaloni's Argentine selection is the world champion. Argentina. Argentina is the world champion. ... 36 years, waiting ... Argentina, Argentina is the world champion.”

However, you don't have to understand a word he says to understand what he was feeling.

"It was a roller coaster of emotion," Cantor told the hosts of NBC's TODAY. "I was just trying to be calm, cool and collected, but I was overwhelmed."

What an incredible moment for Cantor, who has waited his entire career for an Argentina World Cup win. And to win it in such a dramatic fashion with the legendary Messi gaining the final jewel in his crown—it's just the stuff sports fans live for.

Congratulations to Cantor, Messi and all of Argentina for their team's hard-fought victory. Argentina campeón del mundo!

Right now there's a gender violence crisis happening in Argentina.

The gender motivated killing of women is called "femicide," and Argentina has one of the worst rates of femicide in the world. It's a terrifying problem, and one that experts say is intertwined with a culture of "machismo" and misogyny in the country. Some reports indicate that one woman is killed about every 30 hours in Argentina.

But Argentinian women are taking the conversation about femicide into their own hands, and it's been incredibly cool to watch.

They've started to fight back through a campaign called #NiUnaMenos, which means "not one less."


The power of women's voices. Photo by Jaluj/Wikimedia Commons.

Here's what you need to know about the protests:

On May 6, 2015, the body of a 14-year-old pregnant girl, Ciara Paez, was found dead in her boyfriend's garden in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She was another tragic victim of femicide. Paez was beaten to death by her boyfriend, whose mother had also participated in the crime. Paez was just one of many femicide victims under the age of 20 to be killed this past spring, but her murder was the one that sparked the #NiUnaMenos movement.

Following Paez's murder, journalist Marcela Ojeda posted a tweet that read, "They are killing us: Aren't we going to do anything?" with the now famous #NiUnaMenos hashtag.

The message of this tweet sent shockwaves throughout Buenos Aires, and three weeks later, tens of thousands of women took to the streets to protest gender violence.

The #NiUnaMenos movement is a brave and urgent cry for women's rights.

And now the men of Argentina have started to join the movement, too.

In a show of solidarity with #NiUnaMenos, hundreds of men walked through the streets of Buenos Aires last week wearing skirts.

Why? Business Standard reported that one of the skirted protesters said that the protest was a way to teach his son about gender equality. "This march was very useful to convey to my son [...] there is no privilege in being a male," he said.

The men standing with #NiUnaMenos say that they want to help redefine masculinity.

They want to convey the message that men are not superior to women and do not "wear the pants" in society or in personal relationships.

By walking proudly through the streets wearing skirts, the male protestors also wanted to demonstrate that there is nothing shameful about a man in a skirt and that true shame lies with men who commit violence against women.

The lesson here? Maybe equality is possible if we can combine forces.

We have a long way to go, yes. Men hold positions of social privilege all over the world. But in Argentina, it's amazing to see what can happen when men use that privilege to support women's rights. It gives me hope for the gender struggles faced by people living in every country on our planet.

I also believe that #NiUnaMenos is an incredible example of how a community effort can lead to empowerment and how men also have an important role to play in the fight for women's rights.