If You've Ever Wondered What Happens To Kids After They're Rescued From Sex Trafficking, Watch This

Human trafficking happens all over the world, including in the U.S. So we know about it, but what can we do to help? Victims who are rescued from their captors can't just return to regular life as though nothing happened. This is an amazing program that makes a difference.

Transcript:
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Struan Robertson: The stories that you hear are so bad.

Gundelina Velazco: These children came from environments that were brutal.

Peter Bone: It's.. very difficult to sit here and not get emotional about what they've come through, and how young they are.

Paul Morin: These girls, as young as eight years old, are having sex, eight to 10 times a day.

Struan Robertson: That means that they're forced to do anything that a man will want.

Paul Morin: A lot of them get pregnant. A lot of them get STD's. A lot of them will die of AIDS.

Struan Robertson: It's just disgusting that these people do this to children.

Gundelina Velazco: That is what is going on in some dark corners of the Earth. They were very poor, but she came from a normal family.

Struan Robertson: .. Approached by a lady from Manilla, who offered her a job at a department store, and this was one of those times when they thought this was a gift from God, this opportunity.

Gundelina Velazco: Instead of taking her to a department store, the woman brought her to a brothel, instead.

Struan Robertson: She was subjected to the most horrific things. She has very good English, and she's very attractive, and this made her extremely popular, which worked tremendously against her.

Gundelina Velazco: Her family went looking for her, because they did not hear anything about her.

Paul Morin: Her brother and her father had tried to get her out of the brothel when they found out where she was.

Struan Robertson: And they turned up at the brothel, announced who they were and that they'd come to get her back, and they just were blocked out of the brothel, which was absolutely devastating.

Gundelina Velazco: She was freed from that situation because there was a raid by the police. When she first arrived, she was withdrawn, and she was crying all the time, but, little by little, she opened up, and participated in activities in the safe home. Eventually, her real self emerged. It was a beautiful self, a self that is concerned for other people, and when the proper time came, after assessment, we finally brought her home.

Serey: I'm fully recovered of everything.

Struan Robertson: The day that she was reunited, I wasn't there, but I've heard the story, that her blind mother just hung on to her, and just wouldn't let her go, just said "my baby, my baby, my baby."

Serey: I love him very much.

Struan Robertson: Of everything they'd been through, and the fact that they had had this daughter torn away.. and they finally had her back. She had had this real smile, not a fake smile that she'd had to give men for years. The fact that she was free and she'd started this new life, it was an utterly touching moment, and she went over to her mother, put her arms around her mum, and just started to sob. I started crying, I couldn't deal with it. Couldn't deal with it. I had tears dripping off my chin. That was the kind of moment that it was.. turns big men into babies.

Gundelina Velazco: Children should be cared for, they should be in a family where they are loved, but that is not what's happening to millions of children around the world.

Struan Robertson: They come into the round home in all sorts of conditions.

Gundelina Velazco: One girl was trying to commit suicide all the time our backs were turned. We aim to restore them; to bring back what has been lost, as much as possible.

Struan Robertson: They have to just be so gentle from the moment they arrive to understand the girls and watch them come through this process.

Paul Morin: The love they receive is really what heals them.

Peter Bone: Treating them like a human being, instead of a commodity to be bought and sold.

Struan Robertson: It is about life. They give life back to these girls. So, how long should the process take? Until they've got their life back, that's what they're about.

Paul Morin: And every time I come in, the kids are happy, jumping, playing sports.. visibly healed.

Gundelina Velazco: Their life before were far from being peaceful, so we like them to be in peace.

Peter Bone: What a terrible state they were, and how Love146 has helped to save them.

Struan Robertson: What's the most powerful force on the planet? I think love is, and it's called Love146 for that reason.

There may be small errors in this transcript.
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Original by Love146. To learn about Love146 and its after-care programs, visit the website and Like them on Facebook. You can even make a donation if you'd like.

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Posted By:
Laura Willard

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