President Obama 'banned the box.' What it means and why you should care.

By 'banning the box,' he's setting a strong example the rest of the nation should follow.

Earlier today, President Obama issued an executive order "banning the box" for federal government employees.

What does this mean? Well, you know how on job applications, there's sometimes a little box that asks whether or not you've been convicted of a crime? With the wave of a pen, Obama just ordered that box to be removed from applications for jobs within the federal government, saying, "We can't dismiss people out of hand simply because of a mistake they made in the past."


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Australia's new surveillance laws have Edward Snowden's full attention.

Women and minorities are disproportionately spied on, and Edward Snowden has had enough.

While those of us in America were enjoying a long weekend of questionable origin, the Australian government passed some pretty crazy surveillance laws.

If you live in Australia, then basically every single thing you do involving telecommunications (Internet, phone, television — um, you know, life?) will be tracked and stored as metadata for two years. (Sound familiar?)

To put it mildly, this is a terrifying overreach of privacy. The fact is, even if the content of a message is hidden, the location and the people involved can reveal a startling amount about our personal lives.

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He spent 9 years behind bars for a crime he didn't commit. Now he's taking on the justice system.

He's not the first person to be wrongfully convicted of a crime; he wants to be the last.

At just 17 years old, Jarrett Adams found himself convicted of a heinous crime he insists he did not commit.

For the better part of a decade, Adams has fought for his freedom.

A new story reported by MSNBC's Ari Melber takes a look at his incredible journey, which started all the way back in 1998 and ended (or started again, depending on how you look at it) with Adams graduating from law school after spending nine years in prison.

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The truth behind why Daraprim can cost whatever its CEO wants it to

Five reasons drug companies are getting away with charging a fortune for needed medications.

A greedy, cocksure CEO set off a nation of people tired of mysterious and unchecked drug pricing.

Have you ever suspected that drug manufacturers have been given complete license to charge whatever they want?

You wouldn't be wrong.

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