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anne hathaway

Harold Krichel, Wikipedia/Representative Image from Canva

Anne Hathaway hilariously tries to sit in a tight latex dress during Fashion Week in Milan

Anne Hathaway might have played fashion-oblivious Andrea Sachs in “Devil Wears Prada,” but nowadays, in real life (or at least on the red carpet) she’s more on the level of Miranda Priestley—turning heads at every event with showstopping looks.

However, no matter how high her status as a fashion icon rises, the “Princess Diaries” actress still holds onto her humility.

Case and point: she has no problem sharing what it’s really like to wear certain designer dresses. Spoiler alert: it’s not quite as effortless as the fashionistas make it look.


In a carousel posted to her Instagram, Hathway first showed a photo of herself next to Donatalle Versace, while posing in a bright red, very structured latex dress, designed of course by Versace for Milan’s Fashion Week. The two have been muses for each other for a while now.

And while the first picture shows exactly what you might expect from fashion week—fierceness, poise, 130% glam—the next video shows…well, a different side.

“I just want to respect…the integrity of the corset…” Hathaway says while in the most uncomfortable half-sitting-half-lying down position imaginable.

Then, cue giggles as she struggles to get up.

“Help her, she can’t move!” Versace exclaims through laughter.

“I’m fine, I’m fine, it’s for Donatella,” Hathaway quips. Earlier she had assured “Vogue” editor-in-chief Anna Wintour that even though she couldn’t turn in the dress she could breathe easily. The joke continued in Hathaway’s caption, which read:

“Breathing? 😎

Sitting? 🙃”

Press the right arrow on the post below and give yourself a good laugh.

I mean, does this not feel like something straight out of “I Love Lucy?”

We see so many ultra glam celebrity images online, and while a part of us knows deep down that there’s way more than meets the eye, it’s nice to have reminders like this that really show how life is never picture perfect all the time. Even for celebrities. So let this be a permission to laugh at our own imperfections, and to let loose from time to time.

And if you need inspiration for how to do that, try watching this clip of Hathaway dancing to “Anaconda”:

Nia Wilson had big dreams.

Like a lot of teenagers, the 18-year-old loved to rap and sing. Wilson hoped to become a lawyer and start her own cosmetics brand one day. But unfortunately, those aspirations were tragically put to an end.

On July 22, 2018, when Wilson and her two sisters were stepping out of the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) train in Oakland, California, she was stabbed to death by a white man.


Her death caused an uproar across the nation. While police have not decided whether or not this was a racially motivated killing, concerns about white supremacy and white privilege have been brought to public attention. In her statement offering condolences to Wilson's family, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf made a note about the "tragic and deeply racist history" in the United States. From mass protests in Oakland to social media posts, celebrities and ordinary people alike have been expressing their fears and frustrations with racism.

One of those celebrities to honor Wilson is Anne Hathaway.

In a compelling Instagram post, Hathaway nailed the importance of checking white privilege.

As a white celebrity, it's valuable for someone with her influence to speak against the violence women of color have to fear every single day.

"White people — including me, including you — must take into the marrow of our privileged bones the truth that ALL black people fear for their lives DAILY in America and have done so for GENERATIONS," Hathaway wrote in the post she uploaded on July 25. "White people DO NOT have equivalence for this fear of violence."

The murder of Nia Wilson- may she rest in the power and peace she was denied here- is unspeakable AND MUST NOT be met with silence.  She is not a hash tag; she was a black woman and she was murdered in cold blood by a white man. White people- including me, including you- must take into the marrow of our privileged bones the truth that ALL black people fear for their lives DAILY in America and have done so for GENERATIONS.  White people DO NOT have equivalence for this fear of violence. Given those givens, we must ask our (white)selves- how “decent” are we really?  Not in our intent, but in our actions?  In our lack of action? Peace and prayers and JUSTICE for Nia and the Wilson family xx Note: the comments for this post are closed. #blacklivesmatter #antiracist #noexcuse #sayhername #earntherighttosayhername

A post shared by Anne Hathaway (@annehathaway) on

But as Hathaway pointed out, white people must do more than just "acknowledge" their privileges.

"Given those givens, we must ask our (white)selves — how “decent” are we really?  Not in our intent, but in our actions?  In our lack of action?"

Hathaway's observation about the violence women of color often face is accurate — and a horrific reality.

On July 7, a white man spat on and pushed a Korean woman toward a train in Brooklyn. According to a Facebook post accompanying the video footage of the incident, the unidentified white man told the woman to "get the fuck out of my country."

In May 2017, another white person started screaming anti-Muslim epithets at a teenage girl and her friend while riding a commuter train in Portland, Oregon. The man ended up stabbing three men, killing two, for defending the girls.

The Commission on Human Rights released a June 2018 report that revealed 1 in 4 Muslim women said they were pushed on the subway platform while wearing their headscarf. One of these examples include an incident in December 2016 when a Muslim woman was pushed down the stairs in a NYC subway and called a terrorist.

Although it may seem like a simple social media post, it's crucial for other celebrities to join Hathaway in their public criticisms of white privilege.

The issues women of color often face rarely make headlines, but celebrity entertainment news does. With her millions of followers, Hathaway has made the point to tell her community that we could no longer choose to ignore racial violence when it occurs.

Rather than divert our attention way from it, it's time for us to confront racism head on.

Andrew H. Walker has photographed a lot of celebrities in his life. But at the 2016 Toronto Film Festival, he decided to try something ... different.

"[Actors] have, not only this personal inside voice, but they have a public persona that they put out there, and they also have their private self," said Walker, a staff photographer at Shutterstock, in an interview with Mashable. "There's this whole other layer of themselves as people. I found that really, really intriguing."

Walker placed a piece of tape on a table and told an impressive list of "A-list" celebrities to pose on either side of it as their "public" and their "private" selves. The only rule was that they couldn't cross the tape line, so he could composite the photos later. As for which side of the tape they "performed" their "selves" on? That was entirely up to them.


Celebrities can be (understandably) protective of their image. But Walker was surprised to find that 51 A-listers were willing and eager to go along with his plan.

The 15 photos that follow are just a few of the highlights that show a surprising difference between their public and private personas — although which one is which, we can't say for certain.

1. Sigourney Weaver was literally born into the entertainment industry.

But just because she's good at being in front of the camera, doesn't mean that's where she always wants to be.

[rebelmouse-image 19519426 dam="1" original_size="750x536" caption="All photos by Andrew H. Walker/ShutterStock. Used with permission." expand=1]All photos by Andrew H. Walker/ShutterStock. Used with permission.

2. Then there's John Legend, who's clearly worked hard to write and produce so many signature grooves.

Legend's somber expression is a powerful reminder that funky rhythms aren't all fun and games when you're cooped up in the studio for days on end.

3. As for Jeffrey Tambor — well, he's got a bit of a Clark Kent vibe goin' on.

I'm not sure which one is the public and which one is the private face. Because other than the glasses, there's not that much of a difference. Which might also be the point.

4. Parker Posey is in a similar, albeit quirkier, boat.

Which one is the real Parker Posey?! I can't tell because they're both just so eccentrically cool, and so ... her.

5. Meanwhile, Oscar Isaac needs a coffee.

He's a busy guy, and those 14-hour days on set can sure get exhausting.

6. Sometimes Lupita Nyong'o is beaming. Other times, she's just stunned.

Her brilliant smile certainly has a way of lighting up the red carpet. At the same time, I can totally understand if her expression on the right is how she feels inside during those events.

7. Perhaps Amy Adams isn't always the stunning debutante.

Or maybe she's really happier than her dramatic roles let on? Sometimes the spotlight's appeal starts to fade when you're right at the center of it.

8. Even silver fox Richard Gere shies away from the attention he receives.

(But like, c'mon, he's still having fun with this either way.)

9. Sandra Oh seems like she's either distracted or totally overwhelmed.

If you've ever been thrust in front of countless lights and cameras, you know that both emotions are a valid response. Or maybe her expression on the right is the way she looks in those awkward moments when she gets stopped on the street?

10. And there's Rami Malek, who ... is as wide-eyed and aloof as I'd expect.

No wonder he's so good on "Mr. Robot." Unless ... maybe one of his personas in this picture actually is the real Mr. Robot? Plot twist! Hey, where's Christian Slater?

11. As for Jane Lynch, she's always a bit wacky and performative.

Frankly I'd expect nothing less of her.

12. Whether he's upright or relaxing, Chadwick Boseman can't seem to shake that natural steely gaze.

He has the shy, stoic look of a performer with the proper introspection to transform into someone else entirely whenever he's on-camera. No wonder he's so good!

13. Is Felicity Jones that much more chipper than the roles she plays?

Or is she actually more reserved than she appears while smiling on-screen — like she's done ever since she was just 12 years old? Your guess is as good as mine.

14. Even Mahershala Ali has two sides of himself to show the world.

Here's another star who looks like he revels in performing himself, in whatever way that he is today. One thing's for sure: He's a lot less intimidating here than he was in "Luke Cage."

15. And last, but certainly not least, there's Anne Hathaway.

Hathaway has had to deal with all the ups and downs of being both beloved and reviled by the general public, which is perhaps why her two different personas here show such a wide range of expression — and all the struggles that come along with being a person.

Walker's work here is an eye-opening look at the many faces that people put on.

We all have different ways of presenting ourselves in different situations — to our jobs, to our friends, to our families, and to ourselves. We even act differently when we're in front of a camera, perhaps especially when we're trying to show off who we think we really are.

It only makes sense that these celebrities would be the same way since they're people too. But the question still remains: Which one shows their "true" self?

Maybe there's not just one right answer to that. Maybe we're all multifaceted, with our own unique collection of personas, just like these celebrities. And maybe that's totally OK. Because maybe that's what makes us human.

More

Anne Hathaway reveals an uncomfortable truth about her own sexist behavior.

The actress opened up about her own biases in a powerful interview.

Anne Hathaway is getting a lot of praise for her surprising confession about on-set misogyny in a recent interview.

Sitting down with ABC's Peter Travers, who asked if there was a particular film of hers that stayed with her because of the lessons learned during production, Hathaway surprised everyone with her response.

She pointed to her 2011 film "One Day" and her experience working with a female director (Lone Scherfig), which forced her to confront something she hadn't noticed before: not just that misogyny exists, but that Hathaway herself was guilty of harboring it.


Hathaway regrets "not trusting [Scherfig] more easily" on set, she explained.

"I’m so scared that I treated her with internalized misogyny," Hathaway said. "I'm scared that I didn't give her everything that she needed ... because I was resisting her on some level. It's something that I've thought a lot about in terms of when I get scripts to be directed by women."

Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

Hathaway admitted a troubling pattern she noticed in her own behavior. When given a script written by a woman or watching a film directed by a woman, she tended to automatically look for flaws; when looking at the work of men, however, she would subconsciously focus on what they did right.

The first step to overcoming this kind of unconscious bias is to be aware of it and how it affects the work around you.

In Hathaway's case, it was acknowledging that she may have struggled to trust a director because of her gender. Whether it's regarding race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, or a number of other social and cultural factors, we all have our own biases — even if we don't know it. And sometimes, like in Hathaway's case, it can even be a bias against your own group.

Acknowledging your own biases can be hard; admitting them publicly can be even trickier, which is what makes Hathaway's admission so refreshing.

Hathaway hopes her comments will inspire others to more closely examine their own unconscious prejudices. On Facebook, actress Rose McGowan wrote about her own experience with internalized misogyny and female directors.

Photo by Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Christian Dior Couture.

To unravel our own biases, we need to start with self-awareness. Hopefully, Hathaway's own honesty will inspire more people to give themselves a periodic bias-check.