These Irish soccer fans stormed the streets of France ... and cleaned them up.

Let's hear it for the boys in green!

Picture this: A boisterous group of kelly-green-clad Irish sports fans rushes down a street in France, singing loudly and drinking heavily.

I know, I know. But it's not what you're thinking.

While worldwide sports tournaments are generally more prone to involve mass riots among fans, that's not where this particular story is heading.


Image by Philippe Huguen/Getty Images

This group of Guinness-drinking, song-singing, eye-twinkling Irishmen (and women), have been in France supporting their team in UEFA Euro 2016 (the European football championship).

More importantly, though?

They've been going above and beyond to be respectful to the country hosting them and all the people in it.

It's kind of amazing to watch.

The rowdy Irish football fans have been spotted all over France doing good deeds like picking up trash, fixing cars, and serenading people on the fly.

Were many of them drunk while carrying out these good deeds? Absolutely. But that doesn't make their selfless acts of kindness any less lovely.

In fact, the camaraderie (no doubt helped by the drinking) has resulted in the creation of rousing songs and chants that they sing loudly while carrying out their good deeds.

Thankfully, since we live in a world where almost every cellphone is also a camera, many of these moments have been recorded and are being shared wildly across the internet.

On a train, the Irish fans sang lullabies to a baby and even shushed people who were getting too boisterous.

I defy you to show me something sweeter (and funnier) than a train full of excited Irish football fans constantly shushing each other while singing classic lullabies in their bright green jerseys.

This happened shortly after the Irish got pummeled by Belgium in Bordeaux (3-0), proving that a little pummeling isn't enough to ruffle friendly spirits.

In Bordeaux, another group of Irish fans was spotted merrily cleaning up trash.

"Cleanin' up! For the boys in green!" They sang as they cleaned. Sure, the song may only consist of those seven words, but the effect is rousing all the same.

GIF via COYBIG/YouTube

The community was so appreciative of their efforts, even the mayor of Bordeaux gave them a shoutout.

The group also made sure to rectify any damage their enthusiasm may have caused along the way.

When a Irish fan accidentally dented the roof of a car while standing on it to get a better view, a group of his compatriots got together and banged on the car until the dent popped out.

As if that wasn't enough, several of them also stuffed money into the crevices of the car's passenger side door in case the owner had any further damage.

Now that's what I call paying it forward. GIF via Namso SportsTV/YouTube.

They did not, however, get much more creative in their songwriting, but I suppose that can be forgiven, considering how helpful they've been.

When fans began mobbing after a match, the boys in green even jumped in to help solve a tricky traffic problem.

A cyclist struggling to make it through the throngs of people coming from a match suddenly found himself lifted up by a group of obliging (and strong) Irishmen who carried him over to a clearer path.

I suppose the Irish Strongman games are not for nothing. GIF via JOE.ie/YouTube

So, thank you, fans of Ireland for showing us what it means to be truly good sports when it comes to sports.

It's easy to assume that when the energy of sports and competition mixes with alcohol and lots of people, destruction is inevitable.

But at this year's European Championship, one group of fans proved that, even when on foreign soil, cheering for a homeland victory, with a beer in your hand, it is possible to harness the energy of that chaos to make the world a better, happier, and more delightful place.

No matter who wins Euro 2016 on the pitch, these Irish fans are the real heroes in my book. We could all stand to learn a thing or two from them.

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