This mommy cow was crying for her calf. The moment she had him returned to her was beautiful.

The Gentle Barn is a farm and animal rehabilitation center in California and Tennessee.

They take care of injured and weak animals or animals displaced because of natural disasters and other catastrophic events. Additionally, they welcome children from all over to have a chance to practice their empathy and compassion by caring for recovering horses, pigs, chickens, and a bunch of other animals.

The Gentle Barn crew recently had a chance to save a cow. They didn't realize when they first rescued her that she was postnatal with a calf nearby, so the two were separated.


This is how the calf and mother cow were reunited by the loving folks at the barn once they realized what had happened.

You have to see the part when the calf collapses from stress and weakness just before returning to his mother's care. Just in the nick of time, The Gentle Barn saved the day.

Aside from this beautiful moment, The Gentle Barn seems to be a place where beautiful moments are happening all the time.

Portia de Rossi took a tour with owner-operator Ellie Laks in July 2012.

All GIFs via "Ellen."

And yes, the animals really do co-mingle and get along harmoniously like this.

Ellie talks about the horses they bring in:

"The other horse rescuers do the wonderful work of taking in the horses that are ride-able and placeable. ... We take in the ones that are so destroyed that no one else wants them."

PORTIA: "Is he a race horse?"

ELLIE: "That's an ex-race horse. That's Mamma Dear. She was raced until she couldn't walk anymore. That's usually when they put them down, but through some miracle they knew of us and brought her here. And now we've rehabilitated her with our deep tissue massage therapy, and now she's totally sound, totally happy."

After experiencing the resilience and warmth from these animals that survived against the odds, Portia has some sage life advice for us all.

"Oh, I highly recommend hugging a cow..."

Bravo to The Gentle Barn for reuniting mommies and their babies, and for the important work they do to remind creatures of all kinds of their worth and compassion.

"We provide a place — for people and animals — to be reminded that they matter."
— Ellie Laks of The Gentle Barn


NOTE TO READERS: We doubled back with the Gentle Barn, and they confirmed the mommy cow is indeed the calf's biological mother. "The father was dominant and so the calf looks more like the father than the mother. That is definitely her baby.” — Jackie, from The Gentle Barn

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.