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15 tweets that only married people will understand

Even the perfect marriage (if that exists) would have its everyday frustrations.

Photo from Twitter.

A typical... frustrating day.

Being married is like being half of a two-headed monster. It's impossible to avoid regular disagreements when you're bound to another person for the rest of your life.

Even the perfect marriage (if there was such a thing) would have its daily frustrations. Funnily enough, most fights aren't caused by big decisions but the simple, day-to-day questions, such as "What do you want for dinner?"; "Are we free Friday night?"; and "What movie do you want to see?”


Here are some hilarious tweets that just about every married couple will understand.

grievances, irritable interactions, dissastifsfaction

The dinner debates...

Image from Twitter.

texting, resentments, bummer

What do we need from the store?

Image from Twitter.

competition, team, newlyweds

A silent competition.

Image from Twitter.

misplaced items, vanished, missing keys

Stop moving things around.

Image from Twitter.

altercations, , remedy, healing

Lack of empathy.

Image from Twitter.

breakfast in bed, bickering, quarrels

Breakfast in bed!

Image from Twitter.

deliberation, disputes, agitations

Load it; then start it.

Image from Twitter.

espoused, mated, joined in holy matrimony

Marrying up.

Image from Twitter.

united together, walking the path, joined at the hip

Watching shows together.

Image from Twitter.

little forms of affection, affectionate, considerate

Putting the seat down... or up?

Image from Twitter.

tolerant, understanding, all heart

Like me on Instagram. Like me!

Image from Twitter.

inside jokes, tweets, frustration

We both get up when I get up.

Image from Twitter.

funny marriage jokes, marriage memes, marriage tweets

Share and share alike.

Image from Twitter.

marriage, couples, relationships

There are rules to the bedroom.

Image from Twitter.

married life, wives, husbands

Fun with pets.

Image from Twitter.

This article originally appeared on 09.06.17

On Aug. 15, 2016, astrophysicist Katie Mack tweeted this:

Climate change is a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad thing. And if anyone knows this to be true, it's scientists like Mack.

A few hours later, Twitter user Gary P. Jackson responded to Mack's tweet, letting her know she should go learn "actual science" and quit with all this climate change mumbo jumbo.

Mack, in return, kindly let Jackson know that astrophysics is, in fact, actual science, and she's certainly qualified to have an opinion on the matter.

"Pretty much whenever I mention climate change on Twitter, people show up out of nowhere to argue with me that it's not real or that humans didn't cause it,” Mack said. "It's fairly rare that I'll make the effort to have a discussion at all, because it generally boils down to them accusing me of holding up some kind of vast conspiracy, or not understanding how science works.”


With nearly 6,000 likes and 2,000 retweets, Mack's rebuttal clearly resonated with plenty of people online.

One of them was famed Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling.

J.K. Rowling loved the Twitter exchange so much, she shared a screengrab of the back and forth, adding her own two cents.

"The existence of Twitter is forever validated by the following exchange," Rowling tweeted.

That tweet definitely resonated with plenty of people too.

"It's awesome and unexpected and rather overwhelming,” Mack said of seeing Rowling's support.

On a related note, NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies just published new data finding that July 2016 was the hottest month ever recorded.

No, not the hottest in 2016, not in the last decade — the hottest since humans began tracking global temperatures back in 1880.

It also marked the 10th consecutive month of record-breaking highs.

Whatever "actual science" or "global warming scam" Jackson was referring to when he tweeted at an actual scientist, the facts don't lie.

Fact:97% of scientists agree that human-made global warming is real.

GIF from "Anchorman."

Fact: Big Oil has poured millions of dollars into climate-denying lobbying groups that sway U.S. lawmakers into not acting on the issue.

GIF from "Glee."

Fact: Most of the developed world finds it perplexing that Americans continue debating climate change, even though the evidence for it is overwhelming.

GIF from "Stargate Atlantis."

"It's become a political thing, when it really shouldn't be,” Mack explained. "Attitudes toward climate change have gone from being scientific questions to matters of political identity."

Fact: There are so many other facts that support both the existence of man-made climate change and the dire need for us to act quickly.

Do Rowling and astrophysicist Mack a favor and stay woke on climate change, internet.

Welp.

Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.


Ughhhh.

Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images.

So we ... ugh. Hold on.

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

I just need a second.

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images.

OK. Donald Trump is actually the presumptive Republican nominee for president.

For reals.

Lets face it: This is a scary time.

A guy with a real, honest-to-god shot at being the president of the United States is the same guy who once told a lawyer who requested a break to pump breast milk during a 2011 deposition in court that she was "disgusting."

Photo by Isaac Brekken/Getty Images.

It's a wild time to be alive. I'm scared. You're scared.

You know who's the most scared? Children.

Yep. Poor, sweet, innocent children. It's true.

Trump is scaring kids. As his campaign has picked up upsetting amounts of support across the country, parents have taken to Twitter to express their grief at the fact that the former steak salesman and reality star is giving their kids the straight-up heebie-jeebies.

Parents like these:

And these:

People who don't have children themselves have also noticed the fear Trump instills in our country's youth:

Trump even made one young "Star Wars" fan suspicious of her own Trump-supporter grandparents.

And he's certainly scaring kids from other countries, and those who have friends from immigrant families.



Which is something really worth thinking about.

We adults know that Trump can't really deport the millions of people that he says he wants to because we know how impossible enacting that plan would be. But kids don't know that.

Imagine being a kid, seeing an adult on TV talking about kicking families that look like yours out of the country. Of course you'd be terrified.

This is just a small handful of tweets. The truth is, Trump's rhetoric has been scaring America's youth for a while now.

There's been an uptick in violence associated with the Trump campaign, and many of the incidents have involved young voters — from the young woman who was repeatedly assaulted and called names at a Trump rally to the 26-year-old who was sucker-punched in the face ... also at a Trump rally.

Photo by Ty Wright/Getty Images.

Last month, The Huffington Post made a video highlighting instances of young people being negatively affected by the Trump campaign, and NPR's Cokie Roberts recently blasted Trump for creating an environment wherein kids can be hateful toward each other.

How do you make a child feel safe in a world like this?

In December, Melissa Yassini, a Muslim-American wrote on Facebook that she found her 8-year-old daughter Sofia distraught and packing a bag, terrified that Trump would kick all Muslims out of America.

The Facebook post caught the attention of Kerri Peek, a U.S. Army veteran, who rallied other vets around the country to respond using the hashtag #IWillProtectYou and let Sofia know that they would stand up to anyone who tried to hurt her family and other families like them.

Now that Trump is one of the two final contenders for next resident of the White House, there's a lot of questions we need to answer.

Some of them are big questions like, "WTF, America?" and "Is that really how a contested convention works?"

The most important questions, however, are often the ones asked by the smallest and most scared amongst us. Questions asked by children who don't want to be separated from their friends and family, who don't understand why a man who acts like a bully is so close to being president, and who don't get to vote but have to live in the world our votes create.

At the end of the day, what we really need to ask ourselves is this: Do we reallywant a president who scares our children?

Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images.

GAAHHH!

Sorry.

Most Shared

Warning: Your state may be a god-forsaken beer fest. Here’s the map.

The tweets have been counted, and the results of the Great American Beer vs. Church Tweet-off are in. From June 22 to 29, 2012, here are the counties that tweeted more about beer, more about church, and equally about both.