brendan fraser, imani goulet, brendan fraser comeback

Brendan Fraser at the 2007 Tribeca Film Festival.

Actor Brendan Fraser was one of the most popular and beloved comedy and action stars of the late ’90s and 2000s. He catapulted to fame behind blockbusters like "The Mummy" franchise, "George of the Jungle," "Looney Tunes: Back in Action" and the Oscar-winning film "Crash."

However, a confluence of events led him to put his career as a leading man on the backburner in the late 2000s.

Over the course of a decade, he would go through an ugly divorce with the wife of his three children. He suffered serious injuries doing stunts throughout his career and would undergo surgeries on his knee and vocal cords. In 2016, he lost his mother and in 2018, he alleged he was sexually assaulted by Philip Berk, the then-president of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, in 2003.

The series of setbacks pushed Fraser into a deep depression that further hampered his career.


Over the past few years, Fraser has experienced an upswing in his career. He currently stars in the HBO Max action series “Doom Patrol” and has upcoming roles in films by two A-list directors, Darren Aronofsky’s “The Whale” and Martin Scorsese's "Killers of the Flower Moon.”

Over the weekend, Fraser made an appearance at the Calgary Expo where he did a Q&A with fans who seemed primarily interested in talking about some of the stranger films in his catalog; namely, “George of the Jungle,” “Encino Man,” “Bedazzled'' and “Monkeybone.”

He also signed autographs at the event which led to a heartwarming exchange with two fans. A TikTok user with the user name imani.goulet posted a video of the interaction on Sunday, April 24, and it went viral with more than 2.4 million views. During the exchange, Fraser signs a Funko doll of himself for Imani and they bond over a common problem, an uncommon name.

"I've had a lifetime of people mispronouncing my name. I know what it feels like," he tells the two women. As the girls leave the table, one says something that clearly touched Fraser’s heart.

@imani.goulet

#brendanfraser #brendanfraserappreciation #brenaissance i love this man 🥹 my photo op with him and my signed funko are on my instagram: imani.goulet • everyone always says to never meet your heroes, i met mine and we almost burst into tears talking to eachother. thank you for everything brendan! ♥️

"Thank you for making my childhood awesome,” she says. "And mine too," Imani adds. According to Imani, the words almost made Fraser “burst into tears.” The “George of the Jungle” star responded to the compliment with a fist bump.

“You can tell that last comment really meant SO much to him and I am HERE FOR IT,” a commenter named Kim wrote.

“Everyone always says to never meet your heroes, I met mine and we almost burst into tears talking to each other. Thank you for everything Brendan!” Imani captioned her video. “I hope he knows just how loved he is,” BV added.

The exchange shows that even though Fraser has been famous for four decades, he hasn’t become jaded and cynical and still enjoys it when a fan shows their appreciation. It’s that type of sincere reaction that has encouraged many people to root for Fraser over the last few years as he rebuilds his career.

@imani.goulet

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Moricz was banned from speaking up about LGBTQ topics. He found a brilliant workaround.

Senior class president Zander Moricz was given a fair warning: If he used his graduation speech to criticize the “Don’t Say Gay” law, then his microphone would be shut off immediately.

Moricz had been receiving a lot of attention for his LGBTQ activism prior to the ceremony. Moricz, an openly gay student at Pine View School for the Gifted in Florida, also organized student walkouts in protest and is the youngest public plaintiff in the state suing over the law formally known as the Parental Rights in Education law, which prohibits the discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity in grades K-3.

Though well beyond third grade, Moricz nevertheless was also banned from speaking up about the law, gender or sexuality. The 18-year-old tweeted, “I am the first openly-gay Class President in my school’s history–this censorship seems to show that they want me to be the last.”

However, during his speech, Moricz still delivered a powerful message about identity. Even if he did have to use a clever metaphor to do it.

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Matthew McConaughey in 2019.

Oscar-winning actor Matthew McConaughey made a heartfelt plea for Americans to “do better” on Tuesday after a gunman murdered 19 children and 2 adults at Robb Elementary School in his hometown of Uvalde, Texas.

Uvalde is a small town of about 16,000 residents approximately 85 miles west of San Antonio. The actor grew up in Uvalde until he was 11 years old when his family moved to Longview, 430 miles away.

The suspected murderer, 18-year-old Salvador Ramos, was killed by law enforcement at the scene of the crime. Before the rampage, Ramos allegedly shot his grandmother after a disagreement.

“As you all are aware there was another mass shooting today, this time in my home town of Uvalde, Texas,” McConaughey wrote in a statement shared on Twitter. “Once again, we have tragically proven that we are failing to be responsible for the rights our freedoms grant us.”

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Joy

50-years ago they trade a grilled cheese for a painting. Now it's worth a small fortune.

Irene and Tony Demas regularly traded food at their restaurant in exchange for crafts. It paid off big time.

Photo by Gio Bartlett on Unsplash

Painting traded for grilled cheese worth thousands.

The grilled cheese at Irene and Tony Demas’ restaurant was truly something special. The combination of freshly baked artisan bread and 5-year-old cheddar was enough to make anyone’s mouth water, but no one was nearly as devoted to the item as the restaurant’s regular, John Kinnear.

Kinnear loved the London, Ontario restaurant's grilled cheese so much that he ordered it every single day, though he wouldn’t always pay for it in cash. The Demases were well known for bartering their food in exchange for odds and ends from local craftspeople and merchants.

“Everyone supported everyone back then,” Irene told the Guardian, saying that the couple would often trade free soup and a sandwich for fresh flowers. Two different kinds of nourishment, you might say.

And so, in the 1970s the Demases made a deal with Kinnear that he could pay them for his grilled cheese sandwiches with artwork. Being a painter himself and part of an art community, Kinnear would never run out of that currency.

Little did Kinnear—or anyone—know, eventually he would give the Demases a painting worth an entire lifetime's supply of grilled cheeses. And then some.

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