After Monday's deadly bombing in Manchester, England, several commentators began invoking a familiar villain: ordinary Muslims who didn't speak out soon enough.

Among the first to cast blame was British journalist Piers Morgan, who tweeted his criticism a few days after the attack:

It's an unfortunately familiar refrain after a deadly terror incident.

Where were the Muslims? Why did they ignore the warning signs? If they only spoke out more, these attacks could be prevented, the thinking goes.

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Authors Chaz Harris and Adam Reynolds wrapped up their children's book  "Promised Land" — a fairytale featuring a gay couple — during the summer of 2016.

Illustration courtesy of Adam Reynolds.

The very next day, the Pulse nightclub massacre happened.

“We locked off our text, said, 'that’s done’, handed it to the illustrators, and then [the shooting] happened," Harris explained to BuzzFeed.

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J.K. Rowling approved the first-ever 'Harry Potter' comic — for a great reason.

The comic's proceeds go toward the victims and survivors of the Pulse nightclub shooting.

In September 2016, DC Comics and IDW Publishing announced "Love Is Love," a charity comic anthology to support the victims of the June shooting at Pulse nightclub.

Teaming up with more than 200 artists and writers, Marc Andreyko (best known for his work on "Batman" and "Wonder Woman '77") led the charge in curating the anthology of more than 100 short graphic stories packed into 144 pages. In DC's announcement, "Love Is Love" was described as a "love letter to the LGBTQ community."

In addition to featuring some of the biggest names in comics, the anthology also features stories from actor Matt Bomer ("White Collar"), documentarian Morgan Spurlock, and comedians Taran Killam and Patton Oswalt.

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Another major country lifted its gay blood-donor ban. It's about time.

It's time to lift the ban. And it's been time for quite a while now.

I remember sitting alone awkwardly in a row of empty chairs at a campus blood drive when my friend looked over, smiled weakly, and mouthed, "I'm sorry."

She was standing in the line to donate blood. I'd gone with her to do the same thing, but I'd been told I wasn't allowed.

I wanted my blood to help someone out there who could use it. So it hurt feeling that this supposedly dirty part of me just wasn't good enough.

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