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What to do when you're the child of an alcoholic

My dad was an addict, and growing up with him taught me a lot.

Photo with permission from writer Ashley Tieperman.

Ashley Tieperman and her father.


There was never just one moment in my family when we “found out" that my dad was an addict.

I think I always knew, but I never saw him actually drinking. Usually, he downed a fifth of vodka before he came home from work or hid tiny bottles in the garage and bathroom cabinets.

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12 funny comics that might help you feel a bit less anxious today.

"I honestly think that humour can be a saviour at times of distress or, if you just live with a constant level of anxiety and depression like I do."

Everyone grapples with anxiety from time to time, but for illustrator Gemma Correll, it's a longer, constant battle. That's why she started making funny comics to cope.

While Correll is British, to give you homeland perspective, anxiety disorders affect 18% of the adult population (40 million people), making it the most common mental illness. As such, many treatments and coping methods are available both clinically and homeopathically, but since anxiety can manifest differently in everyone, nothing is a surefire fix. Thus it falls to individuals to perform a lot of trial and error.

In a lucky turn of events, Correll discovered her coping method could also be her career. She illustrates hilarious comics, many of which often directly relate to her own anxiety.

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Just when you thought you might have a little break from all the anxiety created by this election year, Thanksgiving has appeared on the horizon.

As if the holiday that already boasts extra-high levels of stress due to travel and cooking mass quantities of food wasn't enough, the divisiveness that's been caused by this election has polarized friends and families in unprecedented ways.

With less than two weeks for us to process our feelings (because the universe likes to torture us), many of us will have to face those loved ones across a dinner table with only a cooked bird and roasted root vegetables to protect us.

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Melissa Spitz's mother was institutionalized for the first time when Melissa was 6 years old.

Back then, Mrs. Spitz had just been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and as the years went by, her mental health continued to decline. She worked her way through a hysterectomy and cancer treatment, which led to alcohol abuse, a prescription pill problem, and, eventually, a divorce from Spitz's father.

"I was actually extremely fortunate and started seeing a therapist when I was 13. It was initially to deal with my mother’s recent cancer diagnosis, but naturally a lot came up," Spitz said. "As a kid it was chaos and nothing made sense. I empathize with her a lot more, but I really feel as if I am still putting all the pieces back together."

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