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Heroes

A girl asks Neil deGrasse Tyson if he knows any dyslexic scientists. He responds with showmanship.

The "interesting thing about high-level science is you can just work at your desk."

SCIENCE FACT: Neil deGrasse Tyson has showmanship.

A little girl asked him a very simple question: "In your field, do you have someone that is dyslexic?"

His answer could have been simple and to the point.


He could have just said "yes" and moved on to the next question.

But he's Neil deGrasse Tyson, so he didn't do that.

He talked about how his colleagues and coworkers with ADD, dyslexia, autism, etc., cope with not being what some people consider "normal."

Having a learning disability doesn't mean you can't do the things you love. It just means you might do them a bit differently.

He told her how people adapt to the situation they're in.

He explained how they adjust for whatever their hurdle is. For example, if a person is dyslexic, they know they're a bit slower at reading, so they make extra time in their workday for reading.


Or if a person has social anxiety, or isn't comfortable making small talk, or has trouble reading social cues, the great thing about the field of science is that it doesn't matter as much as the work you do.

You don't have to be a social butterfly to be a great scientist. The "thing about high-level science," he tells her, "is you can just work at your desk."

But then! Then he got to the most important point.

What do you do when things get in your way? When there's something that might slow you down? Or that people say you can't overcome?

It really can be just that simple. Really really.

Give the man a gold medal already.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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People have clearly missed their free treats.

The COVID-19 pandemic had us waving a sad farewell to many of life’s modern conveniences. And where it certainly hasn’t been the worst loss, not having free samples at grocery stores has undoubtedly been a buzzkill. Sure, one can shop around without the enticing scent of hot, fresh artisan pizza cut into tiny slices or testing out the latest fancy ice cream … but is it as joyful? Not so much.

Trader Joe’s, famous for its prepandemic sampling stations, has recently brought the tradition back to life, and customers are practically dancing through the aisles.


On the big comeback weekend, people flocked to social media to share images and videos of their free treats, including festive Halloween cookies (because who doesn’t love TJ’s holiday themed items?) along with hopeful messages for the future.
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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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