Heroes

A girl asks Neil deGrasse Tyson if he knows any dyslexic scientists. He responds with showmanship.

The "interesting thing about high-level science is you can just work at your desk."

A girl asks Neil deGrasse Tyson if he knows any dyslexic scientists. He responds with showmanship.

SCIENCE FACT: Neil deGrasse Tyson has showmanship.

A little girl asked him a very simple question: "In your field, do you have someone that is dyslexic?"

His answer could have been simple and to the point.


He could have just said "yes" and moved on to the next question.

But he's Neil deGrasse Tyson, so he didn't do that.

He talked about how his colleagues and coworkers with ADD, dyslexia, autism, etc., cope with not being what some people consider "normal."

Having a learning disability doesn't mean you can't do the things you love. It just means you might do them a bit differently.

He told her how people adapt to the situation they're in.

He explained how they adjust for whatever their hurdle is. For example, if a person is dyslexic, they know they're a bit slower at reading, so they make extra time in their workday for reading.


Or if a person has social anxiety, or isn't comfortable making small talk, or has trouble reading social cues, the great thing about the field of science is that it doesn't matter as much as the work you do.

You don't have to be a social butterfly to be a great scientist. The "thing about high-level science," he tells her, "is you can just work at your desk."

But then! Then he got to the most important point.

What do you do when things get in your way? When there's something that might slow you down? Or that people say you can't overcome?

It really can be just that simple. Really really.

Give the man a gold medal already.

Photo by Taylor Wilcox on Unsplash

It's hard to believe that summer is almost over and the back-to-school season is right around the corner. The school year is approaching fast and since many kids have been home pandemic schooling for the past year and a half the return of "normal" is likely to bring kids and parents alike some anxiety about what the return to school will look like.

We have all been living through an extended trauma and this past year has impacted us in ways that we may not even realize—and we may not come to realize the scale in which we have been altered for years to come. Just as we have been learning to cope and navigate the world during a global pandemic, so have our children. They've been expected to perform at pre-pandemic levels for quite some time; this doesn't negate their very real reality of pandemic life.

Kids have had to readjust socially, and in many children this has caused a loss of social skills and increase in social anxiety. With school quickly approaching and the push for schools to open back to full capacity, it's completely normal to have heightened anxiety around the traditional opening of schools. How we handle this anxiety and prepare our children for their own challenges can make all the difference between having a rocky start to an already stressful new school year.


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