5 applause-worthy quotes from Lady Gaga's candid conversation about emotions at Yale University.

Yale University welcomed an unconventional lecturer last week: none other than Lady Gaga.

In partnership with her Born This Way Foundation and the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, Lady Gaga hosted over 200 high school students, policymakers, and educators at the inaugural Emotion Revolution summit. The daylong event was all about sparking conversations on how to improve schools and the education experience so that all students can thrive.


Image from Yale University.

The singer and actress had a candid conversation about the important role emotional intelligence plays in her personal and professional life.

In a conversation with Soledad O'Brien, Lady Gaga opened up about why it's so important for people to be aware of their feelings and express their emotions — an ability often referred to as emotional intelligence or EQ. A person's EQ may affect how they navigate social situations, make choices, or manage their behavior.

Image from Yale University.

Here are five thought-provoking moments from Lady Gaga's presentation (paired with a few of our favorite Gaga photos) that may change the way you think about emotions, self-acceptance, and even the former Stefani Germanotta herself.

1. On confronting her lifelong struggle with struggle with depression and anxiety

#IamNotJust ANXIOUS. I have depression. @btwfoundation
A photo posted by The Countess (@ladygaga) on

"I invented myself, Lady Gaga, I curated my life to be an expression of my pain. This is how I overcame my depression. It's by creating somebody that I felt was stronger than me. But once I went through all sorts of changes, my career taking off, becoming isolated ... nothing was able to fix how I was genetically made. I was born this way."

2. On learning to love yourself

On stage at the 87th Academy Awards. Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

"No matter how much success you have, no matter how many opportunities, fame, fortune, no matter how many accept you to your face, the person that really needs to accept you is you."

3. On the importance of saying "no"

In Brussels promoting her duet album with Tony Bennett. Photo by Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images.

"I realized that part of my identity is saying no to things I don't wanna do. ... It is your right to choose what you do and don't do. It is your right to choose what you believe in and don't believe in. It is your right to curate your life and your own perspective."

4. On making emotions cool again

Speaking at the 2014 South by Southwest Music, Film & Interactive Festival. Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images for SXSW.

"Our emotions are put in this compartment with a massive stigma around it that it is just not cool to feel. We have to make it cool to feel again..."

5. On battling negativity and ignorance on the Internet

Arriving at the 2013 American Music Awards on a fake horse operated by humans. Photo by Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images.

"You have to be a rebel. ... You have to be the antithesis of the status quo. You have to work against it. It's not about a reaction. You don't need to react to anything. We need to be proactive in our own movement of positivity."

But all of that was just the beginning of a much bigger conversation.

That same day, Lady Gaga launched #IAmNotJust, a campaign that values and celebrates how people talk about their emotions.

The singer announced the campaign and hashtag on her social accounts and encouraged fans to ditch labels and join her emotion revolution.


And they're already off to an honest, powerful start:


Couldn't make it to Yale for Lady Gaga's session? You're in luck.

The entire thing is available online. Jump to one hour in and soak up the wisdom of Mother Monster.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via @Todd_Spence / Twitter

Seven years ago, Bill Murray shared a powerful story about the importance of art. The revelation came during a discussion at the National Gallery in London for the release of 2014's "The Monuments Men." The film is about a troop of soldiers on a mission to recover art stolen by the Nazis.

After his first time performing on stage in Chicago, Murray was so upset with himself that he contemplated taking his own life.

"I wasn't very good, and I remember my first experience, I was so bad I just walked out — out onto the street and just started walking," he said.

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