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On Sunday night, the Dallas Cowboys took on the Green Bay Packers at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. While it wasn't a huge shock that the favored Packers pulled off a 34 - 24 victory, people were bewildered to see Ellen DeGeneres, George W. Bush, and their spouses, sitting next to each other in Cowboys' owner Jerry Jones' suite.

The picture of the lesbian liberal comedian sitting next to a former Republican president who called for a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage, didn't sit well with a lot of folks on social media.

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The White House Correspondents' Association dinner is an opportunity for the politically powerful to showcase their ability to take a joke. Naturally, Donald Trump won't go near it.

For the second straight year, Trump won't be in attendance for the dinner. Not exactly known for his ability to poke fun at himself or smile along, it makes sense that he wouldn't want to be there for an evening that both undercuts and exaggerates the press's supposedly adversarial relationship with our nation's leaders.

While the event itself dates back more than 100 years, it wasn't until 1993 that C-SPAN began airing the whole thing live. Since then, comedians, such as Conan O'Brien, Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, Jay Leno, Drew Carey, Wanda Sykes, Jimmy Kimmel, and Seth Meyers, have taken the stage to jab at the politicians and the press — all in good fun.

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During his 1988 campaign, George H.W. Bush warned his son about 'new friends.'

'As we move closer to November, you'll find you've got a lot of new friends. They may become real friends. Or...'

When first running for president in 1988, George H.W. Bush sent a letter to his oldest son, George W. Bush, who was 41 years old at the time.

"We are about to sail into uncharted waters, in terms of family scrutiny," he told his son in the letter, which was shared by The New York Times in 2015. "We've all been through a lot of inquiry and microscopic probing; however, it'll get worse, not just for our family, but for [fellow presidential candidates] Dukakis'/Jackson's, too. Hence this letter to family."

With the letter, Bush Sr. sent an April 1988 New York Times article about a distant relative who tried to use "his contact" with the then-vice president to obtain a contract.

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