On Sept. 27, photographer Brendan Smialowski snapped this photo while traveling with President Donald Trump's motorcade in Indianapolis.

Photo by Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images.

The president was in town to deliver a speech on tax reform.

Keep Reading Show less
More

Russia, economic anxiety, James Comey — pundits have dissected a number of factors that could have shaped the 2016 presidential election. If you ask Ruth Bader Ginsburg, though, sexism certainly shouldn't be left off that list.

The Supreme Court justice — the second woman to have ever held that title — sat down with CBS News' Charlie Rose on Sept. 26, to chat about a number of hot-button issues in American culture and politics.

When the conversation turned to the 2016 election, Rose asked if sexism played a role in the outcome. "I have no doubt that it did," Ginsburg answered to cheers.

Clinton — the first woman to represent a major political party on the ballot — won the popular vote but lost the electoral college to Trump — a man who bragged about sexually assaulting women and once suggested those who have abortions should be punished.

Keep Reading Show less
More

Shannon Sharpe does not mince words. And he has no patience for bullshit.

So if anyone was going to speak truth to power when it came to the displays of "unity" and "solidarity" across the NFL last weekend — following President Donald Trump's inflammatory comments suggesting players protesting during the national anthem should be fired — it would be him. Sharpe did not disappoint, delivering a fiery sermon from the desk of Fox Sports' "Undisputed," saying he was "disappointed and unimpressed."

For nearly eight minutes, an eternity in broadcast time, Sharpe raised the issue of the hypocrisy he saw on Sunday.

Hundreds of players kneeled during the anthem. Others stood but locked arms in a show of solidarity or unity. Former players, front office executives, and owners joined in too. A number of teams as well as the league itself released statements about free speech and unity. And while the public displays looked great on camera, Sharpe wanted to know the answer to an important question: What was everyone actually uniting against?  

Keep Reading Show less
Most Shared

On March 7, 1965, John Lewis was smashed in the head by an Alabama state trooper while protesting for the right to vote.

The impact fractured his skull. Two weeks later, Lewis marched with Martin Luther King Jr. from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, which helped convince Congress to pass the original Voting Rights Act into law.

Keep Reading Show less
More