Photo by Allison Shelley/Getty Images.

Russia, economic anxiety, James Comey — pundits have dissected a number of factors that could have shaped the 2016 presidential election. If you ask Ruth Bader Ginsburg, though, sexism certainly shouldn't be left off that list.

The Supreme Court justice — the second woman to have ever held that title — sat down with CBS News' Charlie Rose on Sept. 26, to chat about a number of hot-button issues in American culture and politics.

When the conversation turned to the 2016 election, Rose asked if sexism played a role in the outcome. "I have no doubt that it did," Ginsburg answered to cheers.

Clinton — the first woman to represent a major political party on the ballot — won the popular vote but lost the electoral college to Trump — a man who bragged about sexually assaulting women and once suggested those who have abortions should be punished.


Ginsburg said Clinton's gender was a "major, major factor" in helping bolster Trump to victory (and studies suggest she may be right).

Clinton, then Secretary of State, greets (from left) Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, and Sonia Sotomayor in 2011. Photo by Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images.

To some, Clinton's loss was a devastating setback to women's equality. But Ginsburg wants us to see the bigger picture.

Women have been breaking major barriers in recent decades, Ginsburg reminded Rose — especially in Congress. 

While Trump won the presidential election, history was quietly made in the Senate last year, as a record-breaking 21 women won seats in their respective states. When Ginsburg joined the Supreme Court in 1993, that figure stood at six.

"To see the entrance of women into places where they were not there before is a hopeful sign," the optimistic justice explained to Rose.

Image by Michael Calcagno/Upworthy.

Notably, there are also more women of color in the Senate than ever before. Last year's election saw Kamala Harris, Tammy Duckworth, and Catherine Cortez Masto pull off victories in California, Illinois, and Nevada — wins that quadrupled the number of female senators of color.

"I'm worried," Ginsburg noted of the current direction the country seems to be headed, "but I'm encouraged by the number of people — especially young people — who are expressing themselves in opposition, reminding us of our most basic values: our freedom."

Watch highlights from Rose and Ginsburg's interview below:

For the first time in its 56-year history, Sports Illustrated will feature a transgender model on its glossy cover. 23-year-old Brazilian model Valentina Sampaio will appear in the July issue, which hits stands early next week. Sampaio wrote on Instagram that she was "excited and honored" to be part of such an iconic issue, adding: "The team at SI has created yet another groundbreaking issue by bringing together a diverse set of multitalented, beautiful women in a creative and dignified way."

A native of Fortaleza, a city in northeastern Brazil, Sampaio has been making history in the fashion world in recent years. She was already the first trans model to make the 2017 cover of Vogue Paris. Scouted while she was a young teen, she quickly made her way onto key runways in her home country. She managed to make an impression in a short time— launching her career at 18 years old—as L'Oréal Paris's first trans model. She hit another milestone last year, when she was the face of Victoria's Secret campaign, breaking barriers as the first trans woman working with the brand.

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