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No, players aren't 'protesting the anthem.' Fox News' Shep Smith explains perfectly.

It's not the anthem or the flag they're against; it's that we're not living up to the ideals they represent.

Whatever the topic, you can count on Fox News' Shep Smith to tell it like it is, and Trump's feud with the NFL is no exception.

While interviewing Politico's Rachael Bade during Monday's edition of "Shepard Smith Reporting," Smith stated what's obvious to many: The outrage from Trump and his base isn't about the flag, anthem, or military.

In recent days, a slew of news organizations (includingSmith'scolleaguesatFox) have claimed that the protests started by former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick were examples of players "protesting the national anthem," completely obscuring what's actually being protested — racism and injustice.


Smith used his show to correct that record.

[rebelmouse-image 19531707 dam="1" original_size="450x248" caption=""They're not protesting the national anthem. That's not what they're doing." GIFs from MMFA/Twitter." expand=1]"They're not protesting the national anthem. That's not what they're doing." GIFs from MMFA/Twitter.

"They're upset about racial injustice in the country, and they're upset about the things that the president has said."

In August 2016, Kaepernick explained the genesis of the protest. He and his fellow players are not protesting the flag or the anthem but, rather, the fact that we as a country are not living up to the ideals the flag is supposed to represent.

"I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color," Kaepernick told NFL Media at the time. "To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder."

"We're complicit," Smith said, acknowledging the way his own network helped muddle the meaning of Kaepernick's protest.

Smith points to Trump, his base, and Trump-friendly media organizations as the source of the uproar, twisting the actual issue being protested to distract from the fact that he's actually had a somewhat disastrous first eight months as president.

Policy-wise, not much has actually gotten done, Smith pointed out, so there's a need to ramp up phony wars with the press and with the NFL to frame him as a victim:

"It’s very clear that for [Trump's] base, this is the red meat of all red meat. Because they’re able to reframe this. They’re able to say, 'Oh, they’re attacking the national anthem, they’re attacking the troops. They’re attacking the flag.'

None of which they’re doing. They’re not doing any of that. They’re upset about racial injustice in the country and they’re upset about the things that the president has said — and yet he’s able to turn it around for his base. Isn’t this all a play to his base and could it possibly be so that they don’t notice there is no health care and North Korea’s the biggest mess since the Cold War?"

So thanks, Shep Smith, for being a the voice of reason here and always keeping it 💯. Watch his clip below.

Health

A child’s mental health concerns shouldn’t be publicized no matter who their parents are

Even politicians' children deserve privacy during a mental health crisis.

A child's mental health concerns shouldn't be publicized.

Editor's Note: If you are having thoughts about taking your own life, or know of anyone who is in need of help, the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline is a United States-based suicide prevention network of over 200+ crisis centers that provides 24/7 service via a toll-free hotline with the number 9-8-8. It is available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress.


It's an unspoken rule that children of politicians should be off limits when it comes to public figure status. Kids deserve the ability to simply be kids without the media picking them apart. We saw this during Obama's presidency when people from both ends of the political spectrum come out to defend Malia and Sasha Obama's privacy and again when a reporter made a remark about Barron Trump.

This is even more important when we are talking about a child's mental health, so seeing detailed reports about Ted Cruz's 14-year-old child's private mental health crisis was offputting, to say it kindly. It feels icky for me to even put the senator's name in this article because it feels like adding to this child's exposure.

When a child is struggling with mental health concerns, the instinct should be to cocoon them in safety, not to highlight the details or speculate on the cause. Ever since the news broke about this child's mental health, social media has been abuzz, mostly attacking the parents and speculating if the child is a member of the LGBTQ community.

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While getting these images might seem like a bit of innocent, inexpensive fun, many are unaware that it comes at a heavy price to real digital artists whose work has been copied to make it happen. A now-viral Facebook and Instagram post, made by a couple of digital illustrators, explains how.

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This article originally appeared on 04.15.19


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A Home Depot store in Newington, Connecticut.

One of Home Depot’s core values is "doing the right thing." The company explains it as exercising "good judgment by ‘doing the right thing’ instead of just ‘doing things right.’ We strive to understand the impact of our decisions, and we accept responsibility for our actions.”

The value is so important that it is written on all of its employees' work vests.

There’s no better example of employees following the company’s values than an incident that happened late last month at a Home Depot store in Bellevue, Tennessee. This story was originally reported by WSMV in Nashville, Tennessee, and we thought it was such a good deed that we wanted to share it far and wide through our Upworthy audience.

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