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Alex Trebek just gave an inspiring one-year update on his pancreatic cancer journey

Alex Trebek, the beloved long-time host of Jeopardy!, has shared an update on his cancer journey to Twitter.

Speaking directly to viewers, Trebek explained that the one-year survival rate for stage 4 pancreatic cancer is 18%. For sure, seeing him so full of life and health at this one-year mark is something to celebrate.


However, he explained that the journey so far has not always been easy. He's had days when he thought that if the cancer didn't kill him, the chemo would. He has also had times when he felt very depressed and wondered if it was really worth continuing to fight.

"But I brushed that aside quickly," he said, explaining that his losing hope would have been "a betrayal" to his wife, to other cancer survivors who look to him for inspiration, to his faith, and to the millions who have prayed for him over the past year.

And of course, he left us with some classic Alex Trebek positivity and encouragement, while promising to keep us posted.

So happy that you are still with us, Alex. You are a wonderful inspiration for us all.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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This article originally appeared on 09.08.16


92-year-old Norma had a strange and heartbreaking routine.

Every night around 5:30 p.m., she stood up and told the staff at her Ohio nursing home that she needed to leave. When they asked why, she said she needed to go home to take care of her mother. Her mom, of course, had long since passed away.

Behavior like Norma's is quite common for older folks suffering from Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. Walter, another man in the same assisted living facility, demanded breakfast from the staff every night around 7:30.

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