via New York Post

As they say, a dog is a person's best friend. But for someone living on the streets, a dog may be the only real companion they have in the entire world.

Pets are a source of warmth and comfort to those living on the streets and they can also give them a sense of purpose. Dogs can also provided valuable protection on the streets by deterring those who prey on the homeless.

Anthony Rogers, a man experiencing homelessness in Memphis, Tennessee, was heartbroken when his dog, Bobo, went missing for two weeks. Rogers had rescued Bobo when he was a puppy from a drug house and calls him his "lifesaver."

Rogers is an artist who has been drug-free for a year and he credits Bobo as a big reason for his sobriety.

When the dog went missing, Rogers contacted everyone he knew to help find his friend and they plastered the neighborhood with "lost dog" signs.

Luckily, Rogers knew a woman named Emily Ziegler that works at Memphis Animal Services and she recognized Bobo when he was brought into the shelter.

When they were reunited, Rogers and Bobo were ecstatic.

At the pound, Bobo was vaccinated, neutered, and microchipped. It also provided a year's supply of heart worm and flea prevention medication.

"To reunite somebody with a loved animal that has been by his side day-by-day is a rewarding experience, and to know that Bobo will be able to be by his side for the rest of his life," Emily Ziegler, Memphis Animal Services digital administrative clerk, said according to WMC.

"It means a lot to me. He's a good guy and I thank everybody for their time and for watching out for us," Rogers said.

via GoFundMe

After Rogers's story went viral, Rebecca Hinds and John Lewis set up a GoFundMe page to help him get back on his feet. In six weeks it has earned over $13,000.

The donations have helped Rogers and Bobo enter transitional housing while they search for a permanent residence.

According to the GoFundMe page, Rogers's "spirits and self-respect are improving considerably! Bobo, Anthony's dear companion, is in very good health and eating well. Man and dog are so happy to be together again."











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Update: Cyntoia Brown has been granted full clemency and released from prison after serving 15 years for killing a man who bought her for sex at age 16.

Brown requested no media availability on the day of her release (smart girl), but released this public statement:

"While first giving honor to God who made all of this possible, I would also like to thank my many supporters who have spoken on my behalf and prayed for me. I'm blessed to have a very supportive family and friends to support me in the days to come. I look forward to using my experiences to help other women and girls suffering abuse and exploitation. I thank Governor and First Lady Haslam for their vote of confidence in me and with the Lord's help I will make them as well as the rest of my supporters proud."

Welcome back to freedom, Cyntoia.

Brown's case has tested the limits of our justice system and gained the attention of criminal justice reform advocates and celebrities alike. Here's a rundown of the basics of her case:

Brown was born to a mother who abused drugs and alcohol and placed her up for adoption. As a teen, Brown ran away from her adoptive family and was taken in by a pimp who raped her and forced her into prostitution. In 2004, a 43-year-old real estate agent, Johnny Allen, paid $150 to have sex with Brown—then 16—and took her to his home.

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