The 91-yr-old founder and president of Bob's Red Mill might just be the world's best employer

Bob Moore just turned 91—a fact that will leave your jaw on the floor when you see a video of him in action. Though he handed over the title of CEO two years ago, Moore still works full-time as president of Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods, the company he founded with his now deceased wife, Charlee, in 1978.


Moore was 49 when they started the company—an inspiring example for those of us who worry it's too late to start something new in middle age. The couple channeled their love of natural foods and whole grains into a continually growing business, which has not only spelled success for the company, but for its employees as well.

Just three years into the business, Moore started a profit-sharing plan for employees. As the business grew, so did the employee pay outs.

"I wanted everyone to share in the profits of the company. It has increased paychecks by a nice amount," Moore told CNN. "I'm more proud of that than anything."

Moore has had ample opportunity to sell the business, but has always declined. In 2010, Moore's executive assistant Nancy Garner told Oregon Live that buyout offers were coming in almost daily, but Moore wanted nothing to do with them, preferring to transfer the company's value straight to his employees.

"These people are far too good at their jobs for me to just sell it," said Moore.

Moore's says his treatment of employees comes straight from the so-called Golden Rule in the Bible—"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." As an employee, he told CNN, he would want a stake in the company. That's why he created an employee stock ownership plan (ESOP), which holds stocks in a trust for employees rather than putting them out to be bought and sold. He officially handed full ownership of Bob's Red Mill to workers in 2010.

Any employee with at least three years tenure is fully vested in the program and will receive their stake in cash five years after they quit or when they retire. Moore keeps the company's value private, but public data shows it has grown substantially in the past two decades. Employee count has tripled since 2010, and the company confirmed to CNN that it did more than $50 million in revenue in 2018. Another 2018 estimate put Bob's Red Mill at more than $100 million in revenue. Either amount means a handsome payout for Moore's 600+ employees.

"This is Bob taking care of us," employee Lori Sobelson told Oregon Live. "He expects a lot out of us, but really gives us the world in return."

While we would all love to have a boss like Bob Moore, most of us would also love to have his sharp mind and youthful energy at his age. Check out this video of him at 90 years old talking about his company, and be prepared to make him your new #aginggoals icon.

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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

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Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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In the Pacific Northwest, orca sightings are a fairly common occurrence. Still, tourists and locals alike marvel when a pod of "sea pandas" swim by, whipping out their phones to capture some of nature's most beautiful and intelligent creatures in their natural habitat.

While orcas aren't a threat to humans, there's a reason they're called "killer whales." To their prey, which includes just about everything that swims except humans, they are terrifying apex predators who hunt in packs and will even coordinate to attack whales several times their own size.

So if you're a human alone on a little platform boat, and a sea lion that a group of orcas was eyeing for lunch jumps onto your boat, you might feel a little wary. Especially when those orcas don't just swim on by, but surround you head-on.

Watch exactly that scenario play out (language warning, if you've got wee ones you don't want f-bombed):

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