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Pop Culture

Van Gogh and Frida Kahlo navigate today's cringey corporate culture in hilarious ad

We've all had bosses like this.

van gogh frida kahlo ad, funny ad, van gogh, frida kahlo
AICP/Vimeo

Van Gogh and Kahlo might have had their critics, but nothing like this.

In a parody video titled “Museum-worthy,” renowned artists Vincent Van Gogh and Frida Kahlo must navigate the constant influx of “creative input” on their masterpieces from cheesy middlemen dressed in period garb and spouting marketing mumbo jumbo.

Even though the sketch was created to encourage professional creatives to enter a contest for the Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), anyone who has had to deal with cringey corporate culture will get a kick out of it.


Van Gogh is informed that while “the client was super happy” with his “Starry Night” painting, they wanted it to make it a “sunny day” for a happier tone.

Also, his painting unfortunately failed a focus group since it did not make viewers “more comfortable about the plague.” So, of course, an influencer, aka Father Anton, is brought in “to break through and resonate with younger audiences.”

Meanwhile, Kahlo is told her unibrow is “too confrontational” and is politely asked to remove the monkey from her self portrait in favor of an animal that “scored higher on trust,” like a puppy.

Give it a watch below:

Triggered? You’re not alone. Just take a look at some of these comments gleaned from Youtube:

“The people who made this commercial really captured what its like to deal with these people. Especially the influencer part.”

“For me this really showed me how ridiculous corporate control and content-isation really is. We're so used to it that we don't think about it any more, but can be soul sucking.”

“Okay, I actually LOL'd at the end No lies detected, though.”

“This ad was BRILLIANT and so on POINT!”

“I love this…it also made me uncomfortable, as it’s just toooooooo relatable.”

Art is subjective, but it seems we can all agree that a) this ad hits the nail on the head, and b) we are ready for corporate cringe to be done, please and thank you.

By the way, if you want to see more of what happened during that focus group for “Starry Night,” you can check out an equally funny companion piece here.

Millennials and Gen Z ditch top sheet to the dismay of Boomers


Once again the youngins are flabbergasting the older generations with their disregard of things they deem unnecessary. There's always something that gets dropped or altered generation to generation. We learn better ways or technology makes certain things obsolete. But it doesn't matter how far we've come, our beds still need sheets to cover the mattress.

The debate is on the use of top sheets, also known as flat sheets. They're the sheets that keep your body from touching the comforter, most Gen X and Boomers are firmly for the use of top sheets as a hygiene practice. The idea being that the top sheet keeps your dead skin cells and body oils from dirtying your comforter, causing you to have to wash it more often.

Apparently Millennials and Gen Zers are uninterested in using a top sheet while sleeping. In fact, they'd rather just get a duvet cover, though they may be cumbersome. A duvet cover can be washed fairly frequently, while some may opt for a cheeper comforter that they don't care is washed often because their distain for a top sheet is that strong.

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That's what happened to Sebastian Cocioba when he and his partner stayed at an Airbnb in Phillipstown, New York.

"Went with my partner upstate and the AirBnB host's cat took us for a guided hike along the Appalachian trail," he wrote on X. "Apparently this is what she does with every guest. She would complain when we took a wrong turn off the trail and knew the way back."

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