This 86-year-old learned how to knit so he could make caps for premature babies.

Dogwood Forest, a senior living community in Georgia, wanted to lend a helping hand to local families who needed it.

Nearby Northside Hospital Atlanta needed caps for premature babies staying in its neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Oftentimes, premature babies struggle to stay warm, so they're kept in incubators with a comfy hat fitted on their heads. These caps are important.

The residents at Dogwood had been happy to help fill the little hat void, knitting dozens of hats for the NICU. And Ed Moseley, an 86-year-old who thought the initiative would keep "the old people out of trouble" was one of them.


But there was just one problem when the project started: Ed couldn't knit.

Photo courtesy of Northside Hospital Atlanta.

"I told my daughter about it, and I said, ‘How can I knit? What do I need to do?’" Moseley told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "And bless her heart, she went to Jo-Anns [Fabrics] and got a kit, yarn, and instruction kit for me. So I started slowly and learned it just takes patience."

Slowly but surely, Ed got the hang of it. His first cap took several hours to make. But after he got into a groove, he could churn one out in no time.

"I followed the instructions, and after two or three attempts, I started making fairly good caps," he told Inside Edition. "We started filling up my couch with caps, and then all of a sudden, caps started coming from various places."

Photo courtesy of Dogwood Forest.

Ed became unstoppable. He's crafted more than 55 colorful caps since July.

His creations contributed to the more than 350 caps the senior center dropped off at Northside Hospital in Atlanta on Nov. 17, 2016, on National Preemie Awareness Day.

So. Many. Caps. Photo courtesy of Northside Hospital Atlanta.

For the parents of little ones at Northside, it's a wonderful feeling to know those on the outside of the hospital are thinking about your family.

"It means a lot to us, because this is our second stint in the NICU," Doug Bunt, whose son, Matthew, was born on Nov. 12, 2016, told Good Morning America. "The fact this man is taking time out of his day to help the kids really means a lot to us."

Doug Bunt and his family. Photo courtesy of Northside Hospital Atlanta.

Ed's story proves you can learn a new skill at any age — and make a big difference along the way.

"When someone appreciates something you do, that makes you feel good, naturally," said Ed, who plans on making about 30 hats a month moving forward to help fill the need. "I got a lot of enjoyment doing this, and now I’ve graduated to large caps. I’m doing caps for all my grandkids."

The seniors who lent a helping hand. Photo courtesy of Northside Hospital Atlanta.

Watch Ed's inspiring story from "Inside Edition" below:

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.