People are gushing over Seth Meyers being an extraordinarily good guy

By now, most of us know better than to get our hopes up about our favorite celebrities. We've watched too many beloved household names fall from grace, and even those who seem delightful in their personas have been outed as kinda terrible people in private. (We'll always have Mister Rogers. And I'm still holding out hope for Tom Hanks, all kooky conspiracy theories aside.)

But a Twitter thread that largely flew under the radar this week has highlighted the apparently universal kindness of comedian and late night talk show host Seth Meyers.

Sara Benincasa wrote:

"When certain pals battered & bruised by an otherwise abusive industry mention Seth Meyers, they go into an enchanted fugue state and talk like they got to work with the love child of Glinda the Good Witch and some benevolent supergenius golden retriever, IDK, he sounds nice!"



Lauren Flans corroborated the claim, saying, "He is the LOVELIEST man! Treats absolutely everyone with the same kindness and interest, and when I saw him at the Boom reunion in Amsterdam last summer, he literally talked to me about a tweet of mine he remembered from SEVERAL YEARS BACK WUT."

And actress Kristen Schaal, a fellow comedian, agreed. "Sooooo true! He has always been kind to me, even in social situations where I felt out of place."

Awww. Nice.

Benincasa said she had heard that praise of him—that he really notices people and brings them in. "Such a kind thing and a real skill too!"

Someone who interned for Meyers added her two cents, which just reinforced what others were saying:

"Interned for him in college and it was my favorite internship I've had. He was the only one who sat down with us at the end of the semester and answered questions/talked with us for while. He said hi if you passed him in the hall. And we were paid, which is great."

Others pointed out that he regularly brings his writers on his show, reallys showcasing their talents. He also uses his platforms to uplift the voices of the smart, funny women on his team.

Alex Miller wrote, "I had the opportunity to sit in for a monologue rehearsal (he does this every day). His writing staff was having absolute blast watching from the seats, and after 45 minutes of rehearsing, Seth comes into the seats and does a Q&A with the audience. Again, he does this every day."

Judd Winick confirmed Meyers' awesomeness "from personal experience as well as professional."

Meyers' brother Josh even chimed in...with some stereotypical brotherly humor.

Not that an absence of criticism proves anything, but the fact that his conversation took place on Twitter and only stories of positive interactions with him came up is pretty telling. Someone once said, "Live your life in such a way that if someone spoke badly about you no one would believe it." Seth Meyers may actually be living that advice.

People might take issue with this brand of humor, his political stances, or his making fun of the world's most easy-to-make-fun-of president. But it appears that those who have interacted with him and worked with him have glowing things to say.

How refreshing in this day and age.

Another thing people pointed out was his delightfully genuine family, which might explain why he is how he is. Each year, he has his parents and brother come on the show, and it's nothing but pure family fun. Enjoy:

The Meyers Family Tells a Traumatic Story Involving Seth's Orthodontic Headgear www.youtube.com

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Wil Wheaton speaking to an audience at 2019 Wondercon.

In an era of debates over cancel culture and increased accountability for people with horrendous views and behaviors, the question of art vs. artist is a tricky one. When you find out an actor whose work you enjoy is blatantly racist and anti-semitic in real life, does that realization ruin every movie they've been a part of? What about an author who has expressed harmful opinions about a marginalized group? What about a smart, witty comedian who turns out to be a serial sexual assaulter? Where do you draw the line between a creator and their creation?

As someone with his feet in both worlds, actor Wil Wheaton weighed in on that question and offered a refreshingly reasonable perspective.

A reader who goes by @avinlander asked Wheaton on Tumblr:

"Question: I have more of an opinion question for you. When fans of things hear about misconduct happening on sets/behind-the-scenes are they allowed to still enjoy the thing? Or should it be boycotted completely? Example: I've been a major fan of Buffy the Vampire Slayer since I was a teenager and it was currently airing. I really nerded out on it and when I lost my Dad at age 16 'The Body' episode had me in such cathartic tears. Now we know about Joss Whedon. I haven't rewatched a single episode since his behavior came to light. As a fan, do I respectfully have to just box that away? Is it disrespectful of the actors that went through it to knowingly keep watching?"

And Wheaton offered this response, which he shared on Facebook:

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."