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Watch this transgender comedian take down Trump on 'The Tonight Show.'

'He probably thinks transgender people are those cars that turn into robots.'

Watch this transgender comedian take down Trump on 'The Tonight Show.'

Believe it or not, Patti Harrison, a transgender comedian, can actually empathize with Trump's proposed military ban on people like her.

Sort of.

"Trump says transgender people in the military would be a tremendous disruption, and I get it," she said assuringly during a segment of "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" on July 26. "If you constantly draw attention to yourself, spend all day distracting everyone, and cost taxpayers millions of dollars, the perfect job for you isn’t the military — it’s the president of the United States."



Harrison was, of course, satirizing Trump's tweets announcing the U.S. military would no longer allow trans members to serve "in any capacity."

The jab was just one of a handful of searing burns, met with thunderous applause from the audience, criticizing the president's decision.


GIF via "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon."

"The Tonight Show" wasn't flying solo in its criticism either; several late night hosts lambasted the ban, too, including Stephen Colbert, Samantha Bee, and Seth Meyers.

But "The Tonight Show" was the only program to feature an actual trans person firing shots at the president's discriminatory proposal.

"I don’t even think Trump knows what 'transgender' means," Harrison quipped. "He probably thinks transgender people are those cars that turn into robots."

Harrison did, however, put the jokes aside at one point to highlight a person who'd be affected by the ban: retired U.S. Navy SEAL Kristin Beck.

"There are amazingly brave trans people that should be allowed to serve," Harrison noted. "Like Kristin Beck, a retired Navy SEAL with a purple heart, bronze star, and countless service metals."

Former U.S. Navy Seal Senior Chief Kristin Beck. Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Beck, whose used her transition to publicly highlight the need for the military to become more inclusive, quickly spoke out against Trump's announcement.

"He's turned his back on a lot of Americans," she told CNN. "He's turned his back on a lot of veterans. And that's just not right."

Beck — who was deployed in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other countries throughout her two decades as a Navy SEAL —  is calling on Americans to rise up and fight back at the ballot box.

"I'd say [Trump's] famous line: 'You're fired,'" Beck explained to CNN when asked what she'd tell the president. "As the American people, we can say that [to all our elected officials]. And in 2018, we can put out in a big loud voice, 'You're fired.'"

Watch Harrison's segment on "The Tonight Show" below:

Transgender comedian Patti Harrison address Trump's military ban

Posted by The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon on Thursday, July 27, 2017
Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less
Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less