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Watch this transgender comedian take down Trump on 'The Tonight Show.'

'He probably thinks transgender people are those cars that turn into robots.'

Watch this transgender comedian take down Trump on 'The Tonight Show.'

Believe it or not, Patti Harrison, a transgender comedian, can actually empathize with Trump's proposed military ban on people like her.

Sort of.

"Trump says transgender people in the military would be a tremendous disruption, and I get it," she said assuringly during a segment of "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" on July 26. "If you constantly draw attention to yourself, spend all day distracting everyone, and cost taxpayers millions of dollars, the perfect job for you isn’t the military — it’s the president of the United States."



Harrison was, of course, satirizing Trump's tweets announcing the U.S. military would no longer allow trans members to serve "in any capacity."

The jab was just one of a handful of searing burns, met with thunderous applause from the audience, criticizing the president's decision.


GIF via "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon."

"The Tonight Show" wasn't flying solo in its criticism either; several late night hosts lambasted the ban, too, including Stephen Colbert, Samantha Bee, and Seth Meyers.

But "The Tonight Show" was the only program to feature an actual trans person firing shots at the president's discriminatory proposal.

"I don’t even think Trump knows what 'transgender' means," Harrison quipped. "He probably thinks transgender people are those cars that turn into robots."

Harrison did, however, put the jokes aside at one point to highlight a person who'd be affected by the ban: retired U.S. Navy SEAL Kristin Beck.

"There are amazingly brave trans people that should be allowed to serve," Harrison noted. "Like Kristin Beck, a retired Navy SEAL with a purple heart, bronze star, and countless service metals."

Former U.S. Navy Seal Senior Chief Kristin Beck. Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Beck, whose used her transition to publicly highlight the need for the military to become more inclusive, quickly spoke out against Trump's announcement.

"He's turned his back on a lot of Americans," she told CNN. "He's turned his back on a lot of veterans. And that's just not right."

Beck — who was deployed in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other countries throughout her two decades as a Navy SEAL —  is calling on Americans to rise up and fight back at the ballot box.

"I'd say [Trump's] famous line: 'You're fired,'" Beck explained to CNN when asked what she'd tell the president. "As the American people, we can say that [to all our elected officials]. And in 2018, we can put out in a big loud voice, 'You're fired.'"

Watch Harrison's segment on "The Tonight Show" below:

Transgender comedian Patti Harrison address Trump's military ban

Posted by The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon on Thursday, July 27, 2017
Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

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A letter to the woman who told me to stay in my daughter's life after seeing my skin.

'I'm not a shiny unicorn. There are plenty of black men like me who love fatherhood.'

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Fathers Everywhere

This article originally appeared on 06.15.16


To a stranger I met at a coffee shop a few years ago who introduced me to what my life as a parent would be like:

My "welcome to black fatherhood moment" happened five years ago, and I remember it like it happened yesterday.

I doubt you'll remember it, though — so let me refresh your memory.

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