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Watch this transgender comedian take down Trump on 'The Tonight Show.'

'He probably thinks transgender people are those cars that turn into robots.'

Believe it or not, Patti Harrison, a transgender comedian, can actually empathize with Trump's proposed military ban on people like her.

Sort of.

"Trump says transgender people in the military would be a tremendous disruption, and I get it," she said assuringly during a segment of "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" on July 26. "If you constantly draw attention to yourself, spend all day distracting everyone, and cost taxpayers millions of dollars, the perfect job for you isn’t the military — it’s the president of the United States."



Harrison was, of course, satirizing Trump's tweets announcing the U.S. military would no longer allow trans members to serve "in any capacity."

The jab was just one of a handful of searing burns, met with thunderous applause from the audience, criticizing the president's decision.


GIF via "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon."

"The Tonight Show" wasn't flying solo in its criticism either; several late night hosts lambasted the ban, too, including Stephen Colbert, Samantha Bee, and Seth Meyers.

But "The Tonight Show" was the only program to feature an actual trans person firing shots at the president's discriminatory proposal.

"I don’t even think Trump knows what 'transgender' means," Harrison quipped. "He probably thinks transgender people are those cars that turn into robots."

Harrison did, however, put the jokes aside at one point to highlight a person who'd be affected by the ban: retired U.S. Navy SEAL Kristin Beck.

"There are amazingly brave trans people that should be allowed to serve," Harrison noted. "Like Kristin Beck, a retired Navy SEAL with a purple heart, bronze star, and countless service metals."

Former U.S. Navy Seal Senior Chief Kristin Beck. Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Beck, whose used her transition to publicly highlight the need for the military to become more inclusive, quickly spoke out against Trump's announcement.

"He's turned his back on a lot of Americans," she told CNN. "He's turned his back on a lot of veterans. And that's just not right."

Beck — who was deployed in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other countries throughout her two decades as a Navy SEAL —  is calling on Americans to rise up and fight back at the ballot box.

"I'd say [Trump's] famous line: 'You're fired,'" Beck explained to CNN when asked what she'd tell the president. "As the American people, we can say that [to all our elected officials]. And in 2018, we can put out in a big loud voice, 'You're fired.'"

Watch Harrison's segment on "The Tonight Show" below:

Transgender comedian Patti Harrison address Trump's military ban

Posted by The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon on Thursday, July 27, 2017

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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