Nurse shares her emotional plea after trying to buy groceries following a 48-hour shift

By now we've all seen reports of empty shelves at grocery stores as a result of people stocking up on food. For some, such stocking has been prudent preparation for hunkering down at home during this pandemic. For others, it's been panic-hoarding of everything they can get their hands on.


Despite public pleas for people to stop clearing out groceries, people keep doing it. And it's hurting those who are on the front line of this crisis—the people who have been so busy making life-saving preparations in hospitals and clinics that they can't "stock up"—our healthcare heroes.

A critical care nurse named Dawn, from the U.K., posted a tearful message online to ask people to stop and think about who may be impacted by their actions.

"So I've just come out of the supermarket," she said. "There's no fruit and veg."

"I had a little cry in there," she continued. She said she'd just come off of a 48-hour shift and wanted to pick up some food to get her through the next 48 hours before she returned to the hospital.

"There's no fruit. There's no vegetables. I don't know how I'm supposed to stay healthy...people are just stripping the shelves of basic foods. You just need to stop it, because it's people like me who are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest"

Dawn is clearly exhausted and emotional, which is perfectly understandable. Working a 48-hour shift under the best of circumstances is difficult, but as a healthcare worker during a pandemic crisis, it's almost unfathomable. To then be greeted with empty shelves when you go to buy basic groceries? Overwhelming.

BBC Yorkshire shared an update that the nurse had been overwhelmed by people's kindness in response to her video and that she now had food and was doing fine. But stockpiling continues to strain stores, putting people on edge. So what can be done?

Aside from governments and public health officials telling people to buy responsibly, many supermarkets are starting to place limits on the number of any one item people are allowed to purchase. Rationing food, which just over a week ago seemed like a wartime remnant of a bygone era, appears to be the wisest course of action right now as we make our way through the uncertain weeks ahead.

If we all shop reasonably—buying a bit more so we don't have to go to the store as often but not hoarding—we can makes sure everyone gets what they need, especially our healthcare warriors on the front line.

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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

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Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

via Brittany Kinley / Facebook

Brittany Kinley, a mother from Mansfield, Texas, had a hilarious mom fail her and she's chalking it up to being just another crazy thing that happened in 2020.

When Kinley filled out the order form for her son Mason's kindergarten class pictures, there was an option to have his name engraved into the photos. But Kinley wasn't interested in having her son's name on the photos so she wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" on the box.

Well, it appears as though she should have left the box blank because the computer or incredibly literal human that designed the photographs wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" where mason's name should be.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

You know that feeling you get when you walk into a classroom and see someone else's stuff on your desk?

OK, sure, there are no assigned seats, but you've been sitting at the same desk since the first day and everyone knows it.

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via UDOT / Facebook

In December 2018, The Utah Department of Transportation opened the largest wildlife overpass in the state, spanning 320 by 50 feet across all six lanes of Interstate 80.

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