lord of the rings, lotr, stephen colbert, lord of the rings anniversary, fellowship of the ring

Like many a fantasy-loving adolescent, I was completely obsessed with "The Lord of the Rings" growing up. It had everything: honorable heroes, compelling storylines and a rich, captivating world full of lore and intrigue. It helped me, and many others, escape to a place where good guys would win and where magic was undeniably real.

Every year, my grandmother and I would head out Thursday night to catch a midnight showing … which coincidentally always fell on a testing day at school the following morning. But nothing could stop us from experiencing Peter Jackson’s undaunted, bold and ultimately touching movie trilogy masterpiece.

So to see The Fellowship unite together once again on "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" … let's just say it filled my nerdy heart to the brim. Along with countless others.

The fact that it was part of an epic rap battle made things even better.


Colbert jokingly complained that he would not be on air to celebrate the 20th (yes 20th) anniversary of "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring." In case you didn’t know, Colbert is a loud and proud LOTR fan.

Noting that the “just okay” Harry Potter franchise marked its anniversary with a cast reunion, Colbert lamented that “Peter Jackson’s towering achievement” got no such honor. To be fair, LOTR was added to the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. So there's that.

Either way, Colbert decided to create his own anniversary tribute … in the form of a rap, appropriately titled “#1 Trilly.”

Next thing you know, we see a puffy jacket sporting Colbert delivering a brilliant rap alongside not one, not two, but all FOUR hobbits. That’s Sean Astin, Billy Boyd, Dominic Monaghan and Elijah Wood, people!

Plus a Gollum, everyone’s favorite arrow-shooting elf and the rightful King of Gondor: Andy Serkis, Orlando Bloom and Viggo Mortensen.

Anna Kendrick even has a hilarious cameo. Not to mention Method Man and Killer Mike playfully trash talking other, lesser franchises. You know, titles like “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Boring.” Savage.

Of course, I haven’t mentioned the video’s MVP yet: Hugo Weaving, who raps. In Elvish. Yes, dreams really do come true.

You can catch the amazing spectacle below:

Thank you to Colbert and the cast for giving us something to smile about. It truly was “one celebration to rule them all.”

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

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Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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