Helen Mirren says the way Hollywood treats older actresses is '[censored] outrageous.'

In a June 16, 2015, interview with The Wrap, Dame Helen Mirren was asked about what it's like to be an older woman working in Hollywood.

And she didn't mince words.


Gifs via The Wrap.

In case you missed that...

Which begs the question...

Why so blunt, Helen Mirren?

In Hollywood, there are precious few leading roles for women in general. That's why so much of the time, you see super talented actresses stuck playing the boring love interest of a male lead.

And you change mine every day, Zach Braff. GIF from "Garden State."

But older actresses? They're in an even worse bind. Because they rarely snag even these roles.

Even though there are plenty of dashing leading men in their 50s and 60s, their on-screen love interests tend to be hella younger than them.

Like 53-year-old Colin Firth and 25-year-old Emma Stone in "Magic in the Moonlight."

Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

And 50-year-old Tom Cruise and 33-year-old Olga Kurylenko in "Oblivion."

Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images

And 50-year-old Steve Carell and 29-year-old Olivia Wilde in "The Incredible Burt Wonderstone."

Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images

How messed up has it gotten?

Recently Maggie Gyllenhaal told The Wrap: "I'm 37 and I was told recently I was too old to play the lover of a man who was 55. It was astonishing to me. It made me feel bad, and then it made me feel angry, and then it made me laugh."

It's definitely tough out there if you're over 35 and female in Hollywood.

Which is a shame, because when older actresses do get to front a film, they tend to crush it.

Like Helen Mirren in her Academy Award-winning performance in "The Queen."

Photo by Vince Bucci/Getty Images.

Or Sandra Bullock in "Gravity."

Photo by Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images.

Or the turnabout-is-fair-play older lady/younger guy romantic pairing of Julianne Moore and Joseph Gordon-Levitt in "Don Jon."

Photo by Mark Davis/Getty Images.

I guess what I'm trying to say is: More awesome older ladies in more bigger roles more often, please.

That would be f**king outrageous. But in a good way.

Here's Dame Helen herself, dropping truth.

True

Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Number 10 / Flickr

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) approved a measure last month that could pave the way for the Catholic Church to deny President Joe Biden communion. The conservative bishops hope to prevent Biden from participating in the sacred ritual because of his support for abortion rights.

Biden is a devout Catholic who considered becoming a priest in his youth. He rarely misses mass, holds a rosary while making critical decisions, and often quotes scriptures. When asked about the bishops' decision Biden said it is "a private matter and I don't think that's going to happen."

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