Helen Mirren says the way Hollywood treats older actresses is '[censored] outrageous.'

It's about [censored] time.

In a June 16, 2015, interview with The Wrap, Dame Helen Mirren was asked about what it's like to be an older woman working in Hollywood.

And she didn't mince words.


Gifs via The Wrap.

In case you missed that...

Which begs the question...

Why so blunt, Helen Mirren?

In Hollywood, there are precious few leading roles for women in general. That's why so much of the time, you see super talented actresses stuck playing the boring love interest of a male lead.

And you change mine every day, Zach Braff. GIF from "Garden State."

But older actresses? They're in an even worse bind. Because they rarely snag even these roles.

Even though there are plenty of dashing leading men in their 50s and 60s, their on-screen love interests tend to be hella younger than them.

Like 53-year-old Colin Firth and 25-year-old Emma Stone in "Magic in the Moonlight."

Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

And 50-year-old Tom Cruise and 33-year-old Olga Kurylenko in "Oblivion."

Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images

And 50-year-old Steve Carell and 29-year-old Olivia Wilde in "The Incredible Burt Wonderstone."

Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images

How messed up has it gotten?

Recently Maggie Gyllenhaal told The Wrap: "I'm 37 and I was told recently I was too old to play the lover of a man who was 55. It was astonishing to me. It made me feel bad, and then it made me feel angry, and then it made me laugh."

It's definitely tough out there if you're over 35 and female in Hollywood.

Which is a shame, because when older actresses do get to front a film, they tend to crush it.

Like Helen Mirren in her Academy Award-winning performance in "The Queen."

Photo by Vince Bucci/Getty Images.

Or Sandra Bullock in "Gravity."

Photo by Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images.

Or the turnabout-is-fair-play older lady/younger guy romantic pairing of Julianne Moore and Joseph Gordon-Levitt in "Don Jon."

Photo by Mark Davis/Getty Images.

I guess what I'm trying to say is: More awesome older ladies in more bigger roles more often, please.

That would be f**king outrageous. But in a good way.

Here's Dame Helen herself, dropping truth.

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