Amy Schumer caught a major milestone moment on video, and it's toddlerhood in a nutshell

There is nothing more delightful as a parent than when your child says "Mama" or "Dada"—or some variation thereof—for the first time. That verbal recognition is a precious moment that most parents treasure, but few are able to catch on video. Unless you have a camera on your little one 24/7 (which would be a little creepy), most major kid milestones live only in our memories or as notes in a scrapbook.

Comedian and actress Amy Schumer got lucky this week, though. She managed to catch her son Gene, who is 16 months old, saying "Dad" for the first time on video. And naturally, it's adorable.

"We just wanted to say hi Daddy, we miss you and we hope you're having a fun day," Schumer said in the video, referring to her husband Chris Fisher, who wasn't home. "Can you say 'Dad'?" she then said to Gene, who paused for a moment then obliged.

Schumer and whoever is behind the camera gasped in surprise, and a woman sitting at the dining table started clapping when he said it. And for a moment, Gene got excited, too.


But then, total toddlerhood happened. Watch:

Poor Gene probably got startled by everyone celebrating and it overwhelmed his little 16-month-old self. Such is life with a toddler. Over-the-top adorableness and joy followed by bursts of tears and wailing. It's just how it goes. That dichotomy is toddlerhood in a nutshell.

"This video was clearly a surprise to us Getting to experience these first moments with my son makes me feel so lucky," Schumer wrote in the caption. Then she made reference to a friend, Angelia Henry, and her son. "I would like to ask anyone reading this to google DJ Henry," she wrote.

According to InStyle, D.J. Henry was a college student at Pace University who was shot and killed by police in 2010. Henry at a party at a restaurant when other patrons got into a fight. Police were called, and as Henry was driving away from the scene, a police officer shot him through his windshield. He was pulled from the car and handcuffed on the ground. He died on the pavement.

The family sued. but a grand jury did not indict anyone involved in the killing. The family accepted a partial settlement in 2016, but in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement, the family is asking for a new investigation into Henry's death.

"This was murder. It's plain and simple," Henry's sister Amber told local Boston news outlet 25 Investigates. "It's obvious it didn't have to end this way. I have a hope in my heart and a fire in my soul that I'm not going to give up until it happens. I know if my brother was here he would do the same thing for me."

Joe Kennedy III shared the Henrys' story in July:

How lovely for Schumer to draw attention to these parents' pleas for justice while sharing her own parenting moments. With more than 2.6 million reactions to her "Dad" video, that's a powerful way to use her influence and reach a lot of people with their story.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Pixabay

As people get older, social isolation and loneliness become serious problems. Many find themselves living alone for the first time after the death of a spouse. It's also difficult for older people to maintain friendships when people they've known for years become ill or pass away.

Census Bureau figures say that almost a quarter of men and nearly 46% of women over the age of 75 live alone.

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