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This teacher's been trying to get 'Hamilton' tickets for years. Then his students stepped up.

Even Lin-Manuel Miranda got a little choked up over it.

This teacher's been trying to get 'Hamilton' tickets for years. Then his students stepped up.

If you've been living anywhere but under a rock with no TV or internet access for the past several years (if that's you: hello! Welcome to the internet!), then you know that "Hamilton," a diversely-cast musical about the founding fathers and all the dueling they did, is a pop culture sensation the likes of which you only experience once or twice a generation.

And that means everyone wants to see it. But until they turn this thing into a movie — soon, right? — tickets are hard to come by and expensive when they're available. If you want to be in the room where it happens, you're either going to have to shell out a lot of dough or win the lottery. Literally. The show offers a limited number of $10 tickets through a daily raffle.


Of course, some people can spend years trying to get show tickets. That was the case for Thomas Corby, a beloved history teacher at New Egypt High School in New Jersey. He'd been trying to get tickets to the show for years with no luck. Then his students stepped in.

As a way to say thank you to Mr. Corby for the impact he's had on them, his students pooled their money together to buy him tickets for the show. I'd call his reaction priceless, but it's actually probably 100% commensurate with how much these tickets cost.

I saw "Hamilton" a few years ago and when I was purchasing my program, the cashier asked me which part I "cried most during," instead of saying "hello." That's just the way this show affects people. Not expecting to answer such a loaded question after a three-hour musical spectacle, I muttered something and scuttled away before I could be interrogated further. Mr. Corby? I'm guessing he's going to have about an hour's worth of material to get through at the merch stand.

Even the show's creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda got a little choked up over it:


While the story is wonderful just because we all love seeing people be kind to each other, it's also an important reminder — even though it's summer — that good teachers can transform the worlds of the kids they're working with. And therefore it's important we protect them, their rights, and their ability to earn a living wage at all costs. OTHERWISE WHERE ARE WE GOING TO GET SUCH ADORABLE VIDEOS? (And also access to all the knowledge and wisdom they possess.)

Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
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