This teacher's been trying to get 'Hamilton' tickets for years. Then his students stepped up.

Even Lin-Manuel Miranda got a little choked up over it.

If you've been living anywhere but under a rock with no TV or internet access for the past several years (if that's you: hello! Welcome to the internet!), then you know that "Hamilton," a diversely-cast musical about the founding fathers and all the dueling they did, is a pop culture sensation the likes of which you only experience once or twice a generation.

And that means everyone wants to see it. But until they turn this thing into a movie — soon, right? — tickets are hard to come by and expensive when they're available. If you want to be in the room where it happens, you're either going to have to shell out a lot of dough or win the lottery. Literally. The show offers a limited number of $10 tickets through a daily raffle.


Of course, some people can spend years trying to get show tickets. That was the case for Thomas Corby, a beloved history teacher at New Egypt High School in New Jersey. He'd been trying to get tickets to the show for years with no luck. Then his students stepped in.

As a way to say thank you to Mr. Corby for the impact he's had on them, his students pooled their money together to buy him tickets for the show. I'd call his reaction priceless, but it's actually probably 100% commensurate with how much these tickets cost.

I saw "Hamilton" a few years ago and when I was purchasing my program, the cashier asked me which part I "cried most during," instead of saying "hello." That's just the way this show affects people. Not expecting to answer such a loaded question after a three-hour musical spectacle, I muttered something and scuttled away before I could be interrogated further. Mr. Corby? I'm guessing he's going to have about an hour's worth of material to get through at the merch stand.

Even the show's creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda got a little choked up over it:


While the story is wonderful just because we all love seeing people be kind to each other, it's also an important reminder — even though it's summer — that good teachers can transform the worlds of the kids they're working with. And therefore it's important we protect them, their rights, and their ability to earn a living wage at all costs. OTHERWISE WHERE ARE WE GOING TO GET SUCH ADORABLE VIDEOS? (And also access to all the knowledge and wisdom they possess.)

popular

Even when the competition is fierce, winning at friendship is more important than winning a game.

A viral video is making people feel alllll the good feelings, which we could frankly use more of these days.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

Prince Harry isn't just a member of England's royal family - he's also a new dad. He and Duchess Meghan of Sussex welcomed Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor into the world last month. He joins William and Kate's three offspring (George, Charlotte, and Lewis) as royal grandchildren. I assume he's being accordingly spoiled with elaborate titles, jewels, and small islands.


Keep Reading Show less
Family

'Love is a battlefield' indeed. They say you have to kiss ~~at least~~ a few frogs to find your prince and it's inevitable that in seeking long-term romantic satisfaction, slip ups will happen. Whether it's a lack of compatibility, unfortunate circumstances, or straight up bad taste in the desired sex, your first shot at monogamous bliss might not succeed. And that's okay! Those experiences enrich our lives and strengthen our resolve to find love. That's what I tell myself when trying to rationalize my three-month stint with the bassist of a terrible noise rock band.


One woman's viral tweet about a tacky mug wall encouraged people to share stories about second loves. Okay, first things first: Ana Stanowick's mom has a new boyfriend who's basically perfect. All the evidence you need is in the photograph:

Keep Reading Show less
Family

A teen took the stage with world leaders and unflinchingly spoke truth to power. YES, GIRL.

Four heads of state interrupted Natasha Mwansa's 4-minute speech to give her a standing ovation.

Watch out world. The young women have arrived, and they're taking the reins.

From Greta Thunberg to Emma Gonzales to Malala Yousafzai, young women are taking the microphone, organizing movements, and demanding the world's attention on major issues. And it appears they are just getting started.

Imagine you're 18 years old, preparing to go to college, and being invited to join a panel in the opening session of a huge international conference. Imagine that panel includes four current heads of state, and you'll be speaking before an audience of thousands of people from around the globe.

Now imagine standing up on that stage and telling those world leaders to their faces, in no uncertain terms, that they need to step up their game. No pussyfooting. No apologies.

Keep Reading Show less
Recommended