The internet nearly broke when the trailer for "A Wrinkle in Time" went viral last summer.

And with good reason, too.

The cast list reads like a block on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, with Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Mindy Kaling, Storm Reid, Chris Pine, and Zach Galifianakis all starring in the film, which is based off the 1962 sci-fi novel of the same name.

Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney.


And on January 24, 2018, the film gave fans another reason to celebrate: "A Wrinkle in Time" got the Barbie treatment.

Dolls made in the likes of Mrs. Who (Kaling), Mrs. Which (Winfrey), and Mrs. Whatsit (Witherspoon), seen respectively below, will go on sale beginning February 23, 2018.

Photo courtesy of Mattel, used with permission.

Obviously, they look marvelous.

Mrs. Whatsit? Perfection.

Photos via "A Wrinkle in Time"; and courtesy of Mattel, used with permission.

Mrs. Who? YES.

And Mrs. Which? Nailed it.

Fans are loving the dolls.

Let's face it: The Barbie brand has been a bit ... problematic, historically speaking.

But Mattel has been trying to change that.

In recent years, the brand has launched new dolls that are more body positive and inclusive. It made waves in 2015 with its clever, progressive ad campaign encouraging girls to dream big, and the company has also made efforts to shatter gender norms that suggest that Barbies are for girls only.

Mattel's bold moves haven't been lost on Ava DuVernay, who directed "A Wrinkle in Time." She was loving the new looks modeled after the film's characters too, claiming in a tweet that while she had Barbies growing up, she's "never had any like these."

More of this, please, Mattel!

Check out the trailer for "A Wrinkle in Time" below:

Photo from Dole
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Photo from Dole
True

As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

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Melanie Cholish/Facebook

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