The reason I believe this election will unite millennials.

While I am angry with the victory of Trump, I would do myself and the people and issues I care about a disservice if I only focus on the pessimism I feel about the next four years.

Thinking about it really does engender great fear and bitter disappointment. Every single issue I care so passionately about could be challenged and uprooted — from climate change to health care to education policy.

While he garnered enough support to win the Electoral College, I do not believe the majority of Americans subscribe to Trump’s dangerous rhetoric. Therefore, while the conservative policy agenda will make huge strides, the most heinous of Trump’s plans — such as deporting 11 million people — are unlikely to bear fruit.


Perhaps most importantly, Trump, even with the office of the presidency, will never be able to bring back the America that ignored the humanity of the LGBTQ community or the America that allowed discrimination of racial minorities. America will never be “great again” in the way Trump promised his voters. His movement will inevitably suffocate itself, and a new generation will be there to pick up the pieces and build a new Republican Party.

It is within this new generation I have found a glimmer of hope — hope in the America we will inevitably become.

My generation will be the most diverse and potentially the most united in American history.

The divisive politics of the last six months are likely to continue over the next four years, and this divisiveness will only unite and mobilize the majority of Americans who do not share Trump’s hatefulness, especially millennials. America will continue to diversify, and we will champion this diversity. Those of us who came of age in the Obama era have seen what is possible, and we will be united when the time comes for us to lead our nation and the world.

My generation will not stand by and allow intolerance to fester. We will not abandon the issues we care so deeply about. We will not stop dreaming about a better America.

We will not give up, no matter who is in the White House.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Number 10 / Flickr

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) approved a measure last month that could pave the way for the Catholic Church to deny President Joe Biden communion. The conservative bishops hope to prevent Biden from participating in the sacred ritual because of his support for abortion rights.

Biden is a devout Catholic who considered becoming a priest in his youth. He rarely misses mass, holds a rosary while making critical decisions, and often quotes scriptures. When asked about the bishops' decision Biden said it is "a private matter and I don't think that's going to happen."

The bishops hope the new guidance would push "Catholics who are cultural, political, or parochial leaders to witness the faith."

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