Last week, Donald Trump went full-on angry teen at Megan Rapinoe, an award-winning soccer player and one of the co-captains of the United States Women's National Soccer Team. Why did the president get so angry? Because a video in which Rapinoe says that she's "not going to the fucking White House" if her team wins the World Cup recently went viral.

The video angered Trump so much that he didn't even check who he was tweeting at when he started melting down on Twitter. Instead of tweeting at Rapinoe, he turned his anger on a young woman who had no idea what was going on or why Trump was attacking her on social media. A great thing to wake up to!

Anyway, that's just one of the "totally normal and permissible" things that happened last week. But we're not forgetting about it. Especially now that Sue Bird, three-time WNBA championship winner, proud holder of multiple Olympics gold medals, and girlfriend of Megan Rapinoe has written a column about the whole ordeal.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

When it comes to LGBTQ acceptance, female athletes are years ahead of the men.

As stigma surrounding gay athletes has diminished, men remain reluctant to come out.

An estimated 50 LGBTQ athletes from around the world will compete during the 2016 Rio Olympics.

It makes these 2016 games, quite literally, the gayest Olympics in modern history with more than double the number that Outsports reported participating in the 2012 games.

What does this tell us? Nothing, really. It's not as though there's been some recent flood of gay and bisexual athletes into the world of elite sports over the past four years. Rather, it's far more likely that LGBTQ athletes have been part of the Olympics all along, just closeted.

Keep Reading Show less
More

Social justice activism took an expensive turn for several WNBA players on July 21, 2016.

Hoping to show support for victims of recent police shootings and for the deaths of Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, and Charles Kinsey, several WNBA players wore shirts with Black Lives Matter hashtags on them to recent games.

According to the WNBA, however, these shirts are in violation of the league's uniform sponsorship policy, so the Indiana Fever, Phoenix Mercury, and New York Liberty were each fined $5,000 for their actions. Several individual players were also fined $500 for wearing the altered shirts.

Keep Reading Show less
Most Shared