When "Doctor Who" announced the casting of Jodie Whittaker in the title role, some people kind of freaked out.

The series, which debuted in 1963, follows a time-traveling alien around the galaxy to solve crimes and right wrongs. Up until now, the titular character has been portrayed by multiple actors, all of whom were men. Whittaker made her debut as the Doctor at the end of the December 2017 season finale. The controversial casting decision was met with a mixed reaction among fans, which prompted the BBC to go on the record with its official ruling: The Doctor is an alien from the planet Gallifrey and yes, can switch gender.

Pretty silly, isn't it?

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10 'Doctor Who' quotes that show why it's the perfect time for a woman in the role.

These are uncharted waters for the long-running BBC series.

After much speculation, the news is out: Jodie Whittaker will be the first woman to play The Doctor on BBC's "Doctor Who."

This news was a welcome relief to Whovians, many of whom have been clamoring to see a woman pick up the mantle of The Doctor for years. To others, casting a woman in the role of a regenerating, time-traveling alien was an outrage. The role had been played by a dozen men before her and was always meant to be played by a man, they insisted.

A letter written by "Doctor Who" creator Sydney Newman to BBC One management in the mid-1980s offering up some suggestions on what to do with the character he'd created more than 20 years prior, however, suggests those outraged voices haven't done their research:

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The 36th season premiere of "Doctor Who" treated viewers to something they had never seen before in the show's 54-year history.

Photo courtesy of BBC Worldwide Limited.

The Doctor's newest companion and co-star is Bill Potts, an openly gay woman.

The Doctor (who has been played by 13 different actors over the years) always has a traveling companion to keep him grounded on his adventures throughout time and space. His companions are almost always female, often young, and conventionally attractive. Their relationships are not always romantic, but as is the case in many shows featuring male and female leads, the romantic and sexual tension is always there, hovering in the subtext.

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