For many years, critics and studies denounced young people for not voting or being apathetic toward politics and activism.

In the past few years, though, a number of teens, tweens, and everything in between have been outspoken on topics such as race, gender, class, and sexuality, raising the awareness level of passionate young people around the globe.    

From crushing the patriarchy to advocating for better educational facilities for historically underserved kids, these adolescents are showing the world that age ain't nothin' but a number, but it's a number that, when used right, can change the world.  

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'Girl Meets World' got canceled. This letter is worth reading even if you didn't watch.

"I am above all humbled to know I belong to such an extraordinary generation."

This week, the Disney Channel announced that after three seasons, "Girl Meets World" would be coming to an end.

The "Boy Meets World" spin-off lasted 70 episodes, following the story of Riley Matthews (played by Rowan Blanchard), the daughter of Cory and Topanga Matthews (played by Ben Savage and Danielle Fishel, respectively), who were the stars of "Boy Meets World," which ran from 1993 to 2000 on ABC.

Blanchard, 15, has made her share of news for what she's done offscreen — and for good reason.

In January 2016, Blanchard shared a powerful essay about how she "quit apologizing for existing" at Rookie magazine. In the summer of 2015, she shared a post on the importance of intersectional feminism on her Tumblr page. She's also spoken out on gender equality at the United Nations and eschewed social expectations when she came out publicly as queer.

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31 celebrities who smashed the stigma surrounding mental illness in 2016.

"Like a dandelion up through the pavement, I persist."

It may not seem like that big of a deal when a celebrity speaks up about their experiences with mental illness. But it is.

Throughout 2016, dozens of actors, authors, artists, and athletes — trailblazers we're used to seeing smiling on red carpets or snagging gold medals on TV — shared the personal battles they've faced behind closed doors. It was a groundbreaking year.

“It levels the playing field," Aaron Harvey says of the many public figures who chose to speak up. Harvey is the founder of Intrusive Thoughts, a group set on humanizing those living with mental illness. “Suddenly, you realize the same struggles that you have might be the same struggles that someone you really idolize have. And that [makes it] OK."

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