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'Girl Meets World' got canceled. This letter is worth reading even if you didn't watch.

"I am above all humbled to know I belong to such an extraordinary generation."

'Girl Meets World' got canceled. This letter is worth reading even if you didn't watch.

This week, the Disney Channel announced that after three seasons, "Girl Meets World" would be coming to an end.

The "Boy Meets World" spin-off lasted 70 episodes, following the story of Riley Matthews (played by Rowan Blanchard), the daughter of Cory and Topanga Matthews (played by Ben Savage and Danielle Fishel, respectively), who were the stars of "Boy Meets World," which ran from 1993 to 2000 on ABC.

Blanchard, 15, has made her share of news for what she's done offscreen — and for good reason.

In January 2016, Blanchard shared a powerful essay about how she "quit apologizing for existing" at Rookie magazine. In the summer of 2015, she shared a post on the importance of intersectional feminism on her Tumblr page. She's also spoken out on gender equality at the United Nations and eschewed social expectations when she came out publicly as queer.


Blanchard speaks during Glamour's "A Brighter Future: A Global Conversation on Girls' Education" in October 2016 in Washington, D.C.  Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Glamour.

Blanchard's emotional farewell to "Girl Meets World" is so powerful partly because of the commitment she's made to change the world at such a young age.

On her Twitter account, Blanchard shared her thoughts on the show's cancellation:

What's most notable, however, is her message to teens and young people everywhere:

"Teens determine and influence all of this in general, and I hope and think our show reflects you for how you are: brave, opinionated, audacious, devoted, dynamic, loving, nurturing, and powerful. ... I will continue to fight to not be talked down to by the shows, books, and movies, that are aimed towards us. I am sorry that this channel is just not able to understand that (don’t think for a moment this happened because of you.) But I know what we are capable of. I know very well what we did. I am above all humbled to know I belong to such an extraordinary generation. What an honor."

In other words, she implored her fans: You're never too young, never too small to help create a better world.

Photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images.

Blanchard and fellow actress Yara Shahidi of ABC's "Black-ish" recently guest-edited Teen Vogue's December issue about activism and representation.

"My need to be an activist came very much from a need to understand history, and how things that happened before have influenced what’s happening now," Blanchard explained.

"To me, activism is a need to know, a need to explain, and a need to help."

Shahidi and Blanchard. Photo by Rachel Murray/Getty Images for Vanity Fair.

While it's sad to hear about the cancellation of "Girl Meets World," we have that show to thank for bringing the powerhouse that is Rowan Blanchard into so many of our lives.

"Girl Meets World" tackled some tough topics during its run, with episodes focusing on things like cultural appropriation, autism, and Asperger's. That's pretty cool, and definitely something we need more of in TV.

Luckily for us, we haven't seen anywhere near the last of her. She's set to appear in Ava DuVernay's upcoming film "A Wrinkle in Time" alongside Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Mindy Kaling, Chris Pine, and others. This positive role model for young people is here to stay, and we couldn't be happier.

Blanchard attends the 2015 Creative Arts Emmy Awards. Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images.

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Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday are teaming up to find the people who lead with love everyday.

Know someone in your neighborhood who's known for their optimistic attitude, commitment to bettering their community and always leading with love? Tell us about them for the chance to win a $2,000 grant to keep doing good in their community.

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Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

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First off, Jake understands what everyone should realize. The customer service representative doesn't own the cable company either, so yelling at someone who is just trying to make a living like all of us is not the answer. Their job is hard enough as it is so give them a break. Jake gave them more than a break. He gave them a song.


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