In November 2011, a camera trap recorded one of the most spectacular immigrants ever.

Deep in the Santa Rita mountains of Arizona, a single male jaguar padded in front of the camera. It was incredible: no wild jaguars had been seen in the United States since 1986.

Adult male jaguars can weigh up to 200 pounds, and the cat quickly earned an equally weighty nickname: "El Jefe," Spanish for "the boss." The boss wouldn't be alone for long. Over the next few years, a handful of other jaguars also appeared, including one as recently as November 2016.

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Australia's Great Barrier Reef, in some form, has existed for up to a half a million years.

Known today as the largest structure on Earth made up of living organisms, the incredible beauty stretches over 1,000 miles across the Coral Sea.

Its more modern form has been in place for 6,000 years or more, meaning it has already outlived the Renaissance, multiple world wars, and the golden age of boy bands.

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For the first time in more than 100 years, Banff National Park in Canada is going to be home to wild bison.

A wild bison at Elk Island National Park. Photo from Johane Janelle/Parks Canada.

The Great Plains and eastern slopes of the Rockies were once home to as many as 60 million bison, but by the late 1800s, settlers and disease had almost wiped them out. In 1889, a prominent conservationist estimated only about 1,000 animals remained.

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Sea lions usually live in the ocean. So why are so many showing up on land?

Whether it's caused by El Niño or climate change, things aren't looking so great for some of our favorite marine mammals.

A week ago, a seal lion pup wandered into a fancy California restaurant.

It was an adorable story of a wayward pup at The Marine Room in La Jolla, California.

But it turns out the pup, nicknamed Marina, wasn't looking for hot brunch spot; she was looking for help.

When sea lions can't find food, they're forced to make their way to the shore to prevent from drowning. Sadly, on shore, there's not exactly a huge supply of food awaiting them, either.

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