35 baby seals were rescued, and their amazing names are getting a ton of attention.

Cute baby seals have been sent off course recently due to high winds and stormy seas.

Like ice cubes in a martini (shaken not stirred), these grey seal pups have been getting tossed around the sea, washing up on various beaches in South Wales — sick, injured, and separated from their moms.

"Sadly it is this time of year when seal pups can be effected by bad weather because they are so vulnerable," Ellie West, animal collection officer at the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), said in a press statement.


Staring right into your soul. Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

The newly orphaned seal pups are vulnerable, but thanks to the RSPCA West Hatch Wildlife Centre in Taunton, England, many of them are getting a new shot at life.

The center has taken in 35 of the seals so far, and they're making the road to recovery more fun for everyone.

But especially for a certain someone named Bond, James Bond.

Daniel Craig at the German premiere of "Spectre." Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images for Sony Pictures.

Each rescued seal pup has a Bond-themed name. And it's kind of the best thing ever.

1. Say hello to Mr. Morton Slumber.

Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

In the Bond universe, Mr. Slumber was part of a diamond-smuggling chain in "Diamonds Are Forever." The seal version of Mr. Slumber, however, doesn't lead such a sneaky life.

He's one of the center's largest seals and has transitioned to living in the outdoor pools. That's progress, Mr. Slumber!

2. Then there's Lupe Lamora.

Photo by RSPCA West Hatch, used with permission.

In "License to Kill," Lamora was the girlfriend of the main villain, Franz Sanchez. But we all know she had a thing for Bond himself, because in the Bond universe a woman who doesn't have a thing for Bond doesn't exist. Amirite?!

3. Hello there, little Kwang.

Photo by RSPCA West Hatch, used with permission.

In "License to Kill," Kwang was the Hong Kong Police narcotics agent who was trying to get all up in a drug trafficking operation. His seal counterpart is a little luckier, having ended up in a better, more nurturing spot in life.

4. They call this lil' gal Domino.

Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

In the 1965 movie "Thunderball," Domino was played by Claudine Auger, and in 1983's "Never Say Never Again," she was played by Kim Basinger. Domino the grey seal is just as popular as her Bond girl namesake.

5. This sleek brown fella is named Silver.

Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

His name is an homage to Raoul Silva — the main villain of the 2012 Bond film "Skyfall." Silva is intense.

Other seals at the center are named after Honey Rider ("Dr. No"), Blofeld (he's been in eight of the movies!), Max Zorin and May Day ("A View to a Kill"), and Inga Bergstrom ("Tomorrow Never Dies"). The list goes on.

One pup named after iconic Bond villain Goldfinger has been at the center for a while.

"We have to try to weigh up whether he's being lazy or whether he doesn't get it," RSPCA worker Jo Schmit told BBC. "It" being basic survival instincts like eating and maintaining weight.

Agh, they're so cute! Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

Developing all those skills is a full-time job for the seal pups and their caretakers.

From rescue to rehabilitation to release, it's strenuous for workers to make sure the seal pups are healthy enough and capable of being out on their own.

The workers are doing everything they can, but the surrounding community has chipped in to help as well. People have come together to donate those green turtle-shaped sandboxes for the seals to swim in while they heal.

The center has received so many of them, they are probably set for even more seals if necessary.

After all, there are like 120 Bond villains.

"Are you my mommy?" Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

Fingers crossed for a release back into the wild for the seals by spring 2016.

It's always heartwarming to see the amount of compassion that's out there, whether to help out fellow humans or animals (or both!). In this particular case, much love to those guiding these seal pups so they can get off on the right foot, err ... flipper.

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