35 baby seals were rescued, and their amazing names are getting a ton of attention.

Cute baby seals have been sent off course recently due to high winds and stormy seas.

Like ice cubes in a martini (shaken not stirred), these grey seal pups have been getting tossed around the sea, washing up on various beaches in South Wales — sick, injured, and separated from their moms.

"Sadly it is this time of year when seal pups can be effected by bad weather because they are so vulnerable," Ellie West, animal collection officer at the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), said in a press statement.


Staring right into your soul. Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

The newly orphaned seal pups are vulnerable, but thanks to the RSPCA West Hatch Wildlife Centre in Taunton, England, many of them are getting a new shot at life.

The center has taken in 35 of the seals so far, and they're making the road to recovery more fun for everyone.

But especially for a certain someone named Bond, James Bond.

Daniel Craig at the German premiere of "Spectre." Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images for Sony Pictures.

Each rescued seal pup has a Bond-themed name. And it's kind of the best thing ever.

1. Say hello to Mr. Morton Slumber.

Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

In the Bond universe, Mr. Slumber was part of a diamond-smuggling chain in "Diamonds Are Forever." The seal version of Mr. Slumber, however, doesn't lead such a sneaky life.

He's one of the center's largest seals and has transitioned to living in the outdoor pools. That's progress, Mr. Slumber!

2. Then there's Lupe Lamora.

Photo by RSPCA West Hatch, used with permission.

In "License to Kill," Lamora was the girlfriend of the main villain, Franz Sanchez. But we all know she had a thing for Bond himself, because in the Bond universe a woman who doesn't have a thing for Bond doesn't exist. Amirite?!

3. Hello there, little Kwang.

Photo by RSPCA West Hatch, used with permission.

In "License to Kill," Kwang was the Hong Kong Police narcotics agent who was trying to get all up in a drug trafficking operation. His seal counterpart is a little luckier, having ended up in a better, more nurturing spot in life.

4. They call this lil' gal Domino.

Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

In the 1965 movie "Thunderball," Domino was played by Claudine Auger, and in 1983's "Never Say Never Again," she was played by Kim Basinger. Domino the grey seal is just as popular as her Bond girl namesake.

5. This sleek brown fella is named Silver.

Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

His name is an homage to Raoul Silva — the main villain of the 2012 Bond film "Skyfall." Silva is intense.

Other seals at the center are named after Honey Rider ("Dr. No"), Blofeld (he's been in eight of the movies!), Max Zorin and May Day ("A View to a Kill"), and Inga Bergstrom ("Tomorrow Never Dies"). The list goes on.

One pup named after iconic Bond villain Goldfinger has been at the center for a while.

"We have to try to weigh up whether he's being lazy or whether he doesn't get it," RSPCA worker Jo Schmit told BBC. "It" being basic survival instincts like eating and maintaining weight.

Agh, they're so cute! Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

Developing all those skills is a full-time job for the seal pups and their caretakers.

From rescue to rehabilitation to release, it's strenuous for workers to make sure the seal pups are healthy enough and capable of being out on their own.

The workers are doing everything they can, but the surrounding community has chipped in to help as well. People have come together to donate those green turtle-shaped sandboxes for the seals to swim in while they heal.

The center has received so many of them, they are probably set for even more seals if necessary.

After all, there are like 120 Bond villains.

"Are you my mommy?" Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

Fingers crossed for a release back into the wild for the seals by spring 2016.

It's always heartwarming to see the amount of compassion that's out there, whether to help out fellow humans or animals (or both!). In this particular case, much love to those guiding these seal pups so they can get off on the right foot, err ... flipper.

True

Anne Hebert, a marketing writer living in Austin, TX, jokes that her closest friends think that her hobby is "low-key harassment for social good". She authors a website devoted entirely to People Doing Good Things. She's hosted a yearly canned food drive with up to 150 people stopping by to donate, resulting in hundreds of pounds of donations to take to the food bank for the past decade.

"I try to share info in a positive way that gives people hope and makes them aware of solutions or things they can do to try to make the world a little better," she said.

For now, she's encouraging people through a barrage of persistent, informative, and entertaining emails with one goal in mind: getting people to VOTE. The thing about emailing people and talking about politics, according to Hebert, is to catch their attention—which is how lice got involved.

"When my kids were in elementary school, I was class parent for a year, which meant I had to send the emails to the other parents. As I've learned over the years, a good intro will trick your audience into reading the rest of the email. In fact, another parent told me that my emails always stood out, especially the one that started: 'We need volunteers for the Valentine's Party...oh, and LICE.'"

Hebert isn't working with a specific organization. She is simply trying to motivate others to find ways to plug in to help get out the vote.

Photo by Phillip Goldsberry on Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less

Electing Donald Trump to be president of the United States set an incredibly ugly example for the nation's youth.

We know how it's affected the national discourse of regular adults. But there's no denying the conduct of a president impacts how children around the world see the example being set for them. Every day for the past four years, children have been subjected to the behavior of a divisive figure that many of their parents chose to exalt to the most powerful office in the world.

Sure, adults can make excuses for him saying he's an "imperfect messenger" or that they "didn't vote for him to be reverend," but these are all just ways to rationalize voting for a man with zero character. What a message to send to children: Act awful and you'll be handsomely rewarded.

But what if you took away the "Trump" name and examined the character traits of him as an ordinary person? More specifically, what if your daughter came to you and said this was the kind of person she was planning to date? Well, one MAGA family found out and the results are funny, insightful and quite revealing about how we somehow hold our leaders to different and lower standards than we expect from ourselves in our day to day lives.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
True

Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

Keep Reading Show less
via Jody Danielle Fisher / Facebook

Breast milk is an incredibly magical food. The wonderful thing is that it's produced by a collaboration between mother and baby.

British mother Jody Danielle Fisher shared the miracle of this collaboration on Facebook recently after having her 13-month-old child vaccinated.

In the post, she compared the color of her breast milk before and after the vaccination, to show how a baby's reaction to the vaccine has a direct effect on her mother's milk production.

Keep Reading Show less

"I cried, and I'm not even American!" That's one of the thousands of comments posted on the newest Black Eyed Peas video, which has been viewed more than 28 million times in one week on YouTube. "THE LOVE" with Jennifer Hudson and Black Eyed Peas was produced by will.i.am and it might be the most powerful campaign-ad-that's-not-actually-a-campaign-ad that's ever been made.

The video is a remake of the Black Eyed Peas' popular song "Where is the Love," but with revised lyrics and a powerful opening of Jennifer Hudson singing along with Joe Biden's DNC speech. As Biden recalls the events of Charlottesville, the video shows clips of news coverage from three years ago, followed by the prayerful chorus, "Father, father, father help us. Send some guidance from above, because people got me, got me, questioning, 'Where is the love?'" Soon will.i.am comes in rapping about the hatred in the world today, we see more of Biden's words backed up by the music, and the effect of the whole thing is just deeply moving.

Keep Reading Show less