35 baby seals were rescued, and their amazing names are getting a ton of attention.

Cute baby seals have been sent off course recently due to high winds and stormy seas.

Like ice cubes in a martini (shaken not stirred), these grey seal pups have been getting tossed around the sea, washing up on various beaches in South Wales — sick, injured, and separated from their moms.

"Sadly it is this time of year when seal pups can be effected by bad weather because they are so vulnerable," Ellie West, animal collection officer at the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), said in a press statement.


Staring right into your soul. Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

The newly orphaned seal pups are vulnerable, but thanks to the RSPCA West Hatch Wildlife Centre in Taunton, England, many of them are getting a new shot at life.

The center has taken in 35 of the seals so far, and they're making the road to recovery more fun for everyone.

But especially for a certain someone named Bond, James Bond.

Daniel Craig at the German premiere of "Spectre." Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images for Sony Pictures.

Each rescued seal pup has a Bond-themed name. And it's kind of the best thing ever.

1. Say hello to Mr. Morton Slumber.

Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

In the Bond universe, Mr. Slumber was part of a diamond-smuggling chain in "Diamonds Are Forever." The seal version of Mr. Slumber, however, doesn't lead such a sneaky life.

He's one of the center's largest seals and has transitioned to living in the outdoor pools. That's progress, Mr. Slumber!

2. Then there's Lupe Lamora.

Photo by RSPCA West Hatch, used with permission.

In "License to Kill," Lamora was the girlfriend of the main villain, Franz Sanchez. But we all know she had a thing for Bond himself, because in the Bond universe a woman who doesn't have a thing for Bond doesn't exist. Amirite?!

3. Hello there, little Kwang.

Photo by RSPCA West Hatch, used with permission.

In "License to Kill," Kwang was the Hong Kong Police narcotics agent who was trying to get all up in a drug trafficking operation. His seal counterpart is a little luckier, having ended up in a better, more nurturing spot in life.

4. They call this lil' gal Domino.

Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

In the 1965 movie "Thunderball," Domino was played by Claudine Auger, and in 1983's "Never Say Never Again," she was played by Kim Basinger. Domino the grey seal is just as popular as her Bond girl namesake.

5. This sleek brown fella is named Silver.

Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

His name is an homage to Raoul Silva — the main villain of the 2012 Bond film "Skyfall." Silva is intense.

Other seals at the center are named after Honey Rider ("Dr. No"), Blofeld (he's been in eight of the movies!), Max Zorin and May Day ("A View to a Kill"), and Inga Bergstrom ("Tomorrow Never Dies"). The list goes on.

One pup named after iconic Bond villain Goldfinger has been at the center for a while.

"We have to try to weigh up whether he's being lazy or whether he doesn't get it," RSPCA worker Jo Schmit told BBC. "It" being basic survival instincts like eating and maintaining weight.

Agh, they're so cute! Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

Developing all those skills is a full-time job for the seal pups and their caretakers.

From rescue to rehabilitation to release, it's strenuous for workers to make sure the seal pups are healthy enough and capable of being out on their own.

The workers are doing everything they can, but the surrounding community has chipped in to help as well. People have come together to donate those green turtle-shaped sandboxes for the seals to swim in while they heal.

The center has received so many of them, they are probably set for even more seals if necessary.

After all, there are like 120 Bond villains.

"Are you my mommy?" Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

Fingers crossed for a release back into the wild for the seals by spring 2016.

It's always heartwarming to see the amount of compassion that's out there, whether to help out fellow humans or animals (or both!). In this particular case, much love to those guiding these seal pups so they can get off on the right foot, err ... flipper.

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Brian Olesen never imagined he would end up homeless.

The former U.S. Air Force medic had led a full and active life, complete with a long career in the medical field, a 20-year marriage, and a love of anything aquatic. But after hip surgery and chronic back pain left him disabled in 2013, he lost his ability to work. Due to changes in eligibility requirements, he couldn't qualify for federal veteran housing programs. His back issues were difficult to prove medically, so he didn't qualify for disability. Though he'd worked his whole life, having no income for five years took its toll. He got evicted from a couple of apartments and found himself living on the streets.

But in 2018, two things completely turned Olesen's life around. He was able to both qualify for disability and to move into an affordable housing community in Miami's Goulds neighborhood called Karis Village.

When people think of affordable housing, they don't usually picture a place like Karis Village. The 88-unit development is brand new, and built with an attention to design that is not always expected for developments that serve as home to people on limited incomes. The apartments have tile floors, marble countertops, and all new appliances and furniture, and the grounds are beautiful and well-kept, with a playground and common areas for residents to gather.

Brian Olesen in his kitchen at Karis VillageCapital One

Karis Village isn't just a housing development; it's a home and a community. Half of the units are set aside for veterans who have experienced homelessness, like Olesen. The other half are largely occupied by single-parent families.

"To me, this building was just a gift," says Olesen. "All of the different parties that got together to put this building together… making half the building available to veterans. We've got no place to go."

Addressing veteran homelessness was one of the goals of Karis Village, which was built through a partnership that included Carrfour Supportive Housing — a mission-driven, not-for-profit affordable housing organization in southern Florida — and Capital One's Community Finance team. More than just an affordable place to live, the community has full-time staff on hand to help coordinate services—from addiction recovery programs to transportation options to job search and placement. Also included are peer counselors who provide emotional and psychological support for residents.

Karis Village, an affordable housing community in Miami, Florida.Capital One

Carrfour President and CEO Stephanie Berman says the core function of the services team on site is to build a supportive community.

"Often when you think of folks leaving homelessness and coming into housing, you think of shelters or some kind of traditional housing," she says. "You don't really think about a community, and that's really what we build and what we operate. What we're really striving to create is community. We find that our families thrive when you create a sense of community."

The intention to create a supportive community at Karis Village was a priority from the get go. Fabian Ramirez, a Capital Officer on Capital One's Community Finance team, says the bank did a listening tour in southern Florida to explore community development and affordable housing options in the area and to hear what was most needed. After deciding to partner with Carrfour, the bank provided not only an $8 million construction loan and a $25 million low income housing tax credit (LIHTC) investment to help build Karis Village, but it also kicked in a $250,000 social purpose grant to help fund the social support services that would be put in place for residents.

"It's not just all about providing the brick and mortar," says Ramirez. "It's about being able to contribute to the sustainability of the development and of the lives of the people who move into the building."


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Olesen says he and his fellow residents benefit greatly from the network of support services offered in the building. He says a counselor comes to meet with him once a month, sometimes right in his apartment. He also gets help maintaining a connection with the Veteran Affairs office. Other services include social workers and counselors for drug addiction and alcoholism.

Olesen loves being around other veterans, and he says hearing the sound of children playing keeps the community lively. He says anywhere else he could afford to live on disability wouldn't be nearly as nice and would likely involve shared kitchens and bathrooms and neighborhoods you wouldn't want to go out in at night.

If it weren't for Karis Village, Olesen says he doesn't know where he would be today: "I had nowhere to go and this is a safe, beautiful place to spend my retirement."

"I don't think they could have done a much better job of putting this place together and supplying us with what we need," he says. "I have so much appreciation for the ability to have a place to live. And then you add to that that it's beautiful and completely furnished and you didn't need to bring anything—I don't know what more you could ask for."

Karis Village and another development for veterans built the same year enabled the neighborhood of Goulds to meet the requirements set forth by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to declare an end to veteran homelessness in the area.

Ending veteran homelessness altogether is a complex task, but communities like Karis Village show how it can be done—and done well. When government agencies, non-profit organizations, and corporate funding programs come together to solve big problems, big solutions can be built and maintained.

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