Patton Oswalt and his fans transformed a Twitter troll's life with a simple but powerful act of kindness.

Social media spats usually end in ugly words or blocking people—unless you're Patton Oswalt.

Actor and comedian Patton Oswalt has made a name for himself off screen as a blunt yet caring, compassionate human. His raw openness after his wife's unexpected passing and his willingness to engage in conversations about depression and dadhood after her death has touched people's hearts and opened people's minds.

And once again on Twitter, Oswalt has proven that he is unquestionably one of the most kind-hearted dudes in Hollywood.


Oswalt shared that a man who attacked him on Twitter needed help, then encouraged people to help him.

Twitter user Michael Beatty had replied to Oswalt's response to one of Trump's tweet with "I just realized why I was so happy you died in Blade Trinity!" and "And you shoot basketball ike [sic] the sawed off little man you are."

Rather than let endless insults fly back and forth until someone finally gave up, as is Twitter tradition, Oswalt dug a bit deeper and came up with this gem:

"Aw, man," he wrote. "This dude just attacked me on Twitter and I joked back but then I looked at his timeline and he’s in a LOT of trouble health-wise. I’d be pissed off too. He’s been dealt some shitty cards — let’s deal him some good ones. Click and donate — just like I’m about to."

Beatty, a Vietnam veteran, had shared a GoFundMe describing a recent, harrowing two-week hospitalization battling sepsis, a potentially fatal blood infection, and struggles in managing his diabetes throughout. When Oswalt saw the link, he shared it with his followers and encouraged people to donate to this man who'd had nothing but nasty things to say to him.

Oswalt donated $2000 himself toward the man's $5000 goal. A mere few hours later, his followers pushed it over $12,000.

As of the writing of this article, the GoFundMe has raised almost $13,000. Beatty responded with a humble, sincere message for Oswalt:

"Patton," he wrote. "You have humbled me to the point where I can barely compose my words. You have caused me to take pause and reflect on how harmful words from my mouth could result in such an outpouring.  Thank you for this and I will pass this on to my cousin who needs help. A cascade."

Beatty followed that up with another tweet thanking everyone who donated:

People have responded to Oswalt's kindness and Beatty's response with hope that such actions may change people's hearts.

And Oswalt, always the jokester, responded to Beatty's Tweet with sarcastic humor.

Keep up the awesome humaning, Patton Oswalt. We need more of you in the world.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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