Nobody came to his 'Stranger Things' birthday party. The show's cast found out.

Aaron Alambat had a "Stranger Things" birthday party. It looked badass.

There was a cake made in honor of the Netflix series, Demogorgon blood (punch) to drink, and — of course — holiday lights strung up to communicate with those stuck in the Upside Down. (If none of that made sense to you, you really need to watch the show.)

The only thing the party could have used were more of Aaron's friends.

Aaron's sister, Ayen, pointed out in a disheartening tweet that, even though Aaron invited eight of his classmates, "none of their punk selves showed up."



Ugh.💔


The good news is that other Twitter users wanted to make sure Aaron still had a great birthday party. So they started replying to the tweet.

A radio DJ wanted to give him a shoutout on air.

Someone else said that his whole supportive "Twitter fam" will show up for a good time next year.

One encouraging user opened up about a similar experience they had as a kid, writing, "In 5th grade I made invitations to a laser tag party and none of my friends showed up. ... This past weekend I had a surprise birthday and it was laser tag."

Internet star Bretman Rock chimed in, too, noting how delicious all the Filipino food looked in the pics.

It didn't take long before the tweet made its way to the feeds of a few "Stranger Things" cast members.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Netflix.

Actress Millie Bobby Brown, who plays Eleven on the show, said she wants to come to Aaron's birthday party next year. "You can let them all know that everyone on behalf [of] 'Stranger Things' would’ve come! I think [you're] awesome and next year I would like an invite ... Please?"

Actor Gaten Matarazzo, who plays Dustin, replied to Brown's tweet: "Count me in too! I'll bring the chocolate pudding."

All the positive vibes and well-wishes seemed to turn Aaron's birthday into an experience he'll never forget — in a good way!

In a tweet posted the following day, Ayen updated all those wondering how her brother was doing in the aftermath of her viral tweet.

Aaron is "chillin now" and doing just fine.

Sharing tough life experiences with complete strangers can actually bring out the best in humanity sometimes, it seems. And who knows? A few celebrities may even chime in to show their love and support for you, too.

Stranger things have happened.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.