Lady Gaga gave an emotional Grammys speech about mental health we all need to hear.

Lady Gaga used her moment in the Grammy spotlight to plead for mental health awareness and help.

Artists at award shows often grab the opportunity with a large, captive audience to shed light on issues that are important to them. Last night, Lady Gaga used hers to address an issue that's near and dear to her heart.

Lady Gaga, who won three awards at last night's Grammys, gave an emotional speech highlighting the fact that so many people struggle with mental health issues without getting the help they desperately need.  


"I'm so proud to be a part of a movie that addresses mental health issues," she said, referring to her role in "A Star is Born."

"They're so important. A lot of artists deal with that, and we've got to take care of each other."

It's not only artists who struggle with mental health. According to the National Alliance on Mental Heath, 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences a mental illness in any given year. Additionally, 1 in 5 youth aged 13–18 experiences a severe mental disorder at some point during their life.

"If you see somebody that's hurting, don't look away," Gaga continued. "And if you're hurting, even though it might be hard, try to find that bravery within yourself to dive deep and go tell somebody and take them up in your head with you."

The "A Star is Born" star speaks from her own personal experiences with mental illness.

Gaga's character in "A Star is Born" was in a relationship with an alcoholic who struggled with depression and ultimately died by suicide. But the singer-turned-actress superstar has also talked about her own mental illness struggles openly in interviews and other speeches.

In a speech at the SAG-AFTRA Foundation Patron of the Artists Awards in November 2018, Lady Gaga spoke candidly about her experiences with "disassociation and PTSD" and how she finally sought professional help and developed a mental health support team. She said her initial symptoms “later morphed into physical chronic pain, fibromyalgia, panic attacks, acute trauma responses, and debilitating mental spirals that have included suicidal ideation and masochistic behavior.”

“We need to bring mental health into the light," she said. "We need to share our stories so that global mental health no longer resides and festers in the darkness.”

Celebrities raising awareness can help remove the stigma that often accompanies mental illness.

Many people who struggle with mental health issues don't seek help because of the stigma surrounding mental illness. They may worry that people will think they're "crazy" or weak. They may worry that they will be discriminated against if they share their health problems openly.

But bringing mental health out of the shadows is really the only way to battle the stigma. When people share what they've been through and how they're managing their mental health issues, it helps people feel more comfortable seeking help. Thanks to Lady Gaga for continually bringing these issues into the light.

Watch her emotional award speech here:

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When Molly Reeser was a student at Michigan State University, she took a job mucking horse stalls to help pay for classes. While she was there, she met a 10-year-old girl named Casey, who was being treated for cancer, and — because both were animal lovers — they became fast friends.

Two years later, Casey died of cancer.

"Everyone at the barn wanted to do something to honor her memory," Molly remembers. A lot of suggestions were thrown out, but Molly knew that there was a bigger, more enduring way to do it.

"I saw firsthand how horses helped Casey and her family escape from the difficult and terrifying times they were enduring. I knew that there must be other families who could benefit from horses in the way she and her family had."

Molly approached the barn owners and asked if they would be open to letting her hold a one-day event. She wanted to bring pediatric cancer patients to the farm, where they could enjoy the horses and peaceful setting. They agreed, and with the help of her closest friends and the "emergency" credit card her parents had given her, Molly created her first Camp Casey. She worked with the local hospital where Casey had been a patient and invited 20 patients, their siblings and their parents.

The event was a huge success — and it was originally meant to be just that: a one-day thing. But, Molly says, "I believe Casey had other plans."

One week after the event, Molly received a letter from a five-year-old boy who had brain cancer. He had been at Camp Casey and said it was "the best day of his life."

"[After that], I knew that we had to pull it off again," Molly says. And they did. Every month for the next few years, they threw a Camp Casey. And when Molly graduated, she did the most terrifying thing she had ever done and told her parents that she would be waitressing for a year to see if it might be possible to turn Camp Casey into an actual nonprofit organization. That year of waitressing turned into six, but in the end she was able to pull it off: by 2010, Camp Casey became a non-profit with a paid staff.

"I am grateful for all the ways I've experienced good luck in my life and, therefore, I believe I have a responsibility to give back. It brings me tremendous joy to see people, animals, or things coming together to create goodness in a world that can often be filled with hardships."

Camp Casey serves 1500 children under the age of 18 each year in Michigan. "The organization looks different than when it started," Molly says. "We now operate four cost-free programs that bring accessible horseback riding and recreational services to children with cancer, sickle cell disease, and other life-threatening illnesses."

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