Busy Philipps is brutally honest about mom-ing. And she's got some great advice too.

Being a mom can be hard.

You don't have to be a mom to know that. Obviously, I'll never be a mom and I certainly know it. For moms — especially now, when advice on how to be "the very best" is driving moms to distraction — there's a lot of pressure to be perfect. But what does "perfection" even mean? How do you define it? And does letting your kids enjoy Teddy Grahams (best snack) and too much "Yo Gabba Gabba!" (fun for adults too!) mean you're not setting them up for success?

After all, haven't all moms felt like a "hot mess" at some point? And shouldn't it be OK to admit that?


More and more women are showing up to rebel against the idea of "perfect" motherhood. And that's a good thing.

That's why movies like "Bad Moms" are so popular (and getting sequels) and why you'll find celebs and non-celebs alike speaking out about the realities of motherhood.

And that's why this video of Busy Philipps, who recently sat down with People magazine to answer some anonymous moms' most pressing questions, is pure delight.

Philipps lovingly admits she doesn't have all the answers, but she does give some real talk about the reality of screen time and how hard it can be to make friends with other parents. Of course, the best advice for any parent: "It's all about balance," whether that's how often you change your baby's onesie or how prominent "princess culture" is in your kiddo's world.

Philipps, who just signed on for her very own late-night talk show, has never shied away from speaking openly about the rewards — and the awkward hilarity — of her life as a mom of two.

Listen, anyone who can help their baby perfect a side-eye is a parenting master in my book:

Philipps is a great reminder that nobody has all the answers, and parents don't need to take themselves too seriously.

As Instagram-famous mom Sia Cooper wrote in a viral post in April 2018, "There's no one right way to parent or to be a mom." She continued: "We all are running in the same race and doing the best that we can. Motherhood is not a one size fits all — what works for one family may not work for the next. So who are we to judge another mom's choices or reasoning?"

So why not celebrate all the parents — like Philipps — who are out there doing their best and feeling free to laugh and be open about it? You're nailing it!

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.