Busy Philipps is brutally honest about mom-ing. And she's got some great advice too.

Being a mom can be hard.

You don't have to be a mom to know that. Obviously, I'll never be a mom and I certainly know it. For moms — especially now, when advice on how to be "the very best" is driving moms to distraction — there's a lot of pressure to be perfect. But what does "perfection" even mean? How do you define it? And does letting your kids enjoy Teddy Grahams (best snack) and too much "Yo Gabba Gabba!" (fun for adults too!) mean you're not setting them up for success?

After all, haven't all moms felt like a "hot mess" at some point? And shouldn't it be OK to admit that?


More and more women are showing up to rebel against the idea of "perfect" motherhood. And that's a good thing.

That's why movies like "Bad Moms" are so popular (and getting sequels) and why you'll find celebs and non-celebs alike speaking out about the realities of motherhood.

And that's why this video of Busy Philipps, who recently sat down with People magazine to answer some anonymous moms' most pressing questions, is pure delight.

Philipps lovingly admits she doesn't have all the answers, but she does give some real talk about the reality of screen time and how hard it can be to make friends with other parents. Of course, the best advice for any parent: "It's all about balance," whether that's how often you change your baby's onesie or how prominent "princess culture" is in your kiddo's world.

Philipps, who just signed on for her very own late-night talk show, has never shied away from speaking openly about the rewards — and the awkward hilarity — of her life as a mom of two.

Listen, anyone who can help their baby perfect a side-eye is a parenting master in my book:

Philipps is a great reminder that nobody has all the answers, and parents don't need to take themselves too seriously.

As Instagram-famous mom Sia Cooper wrote in a viral post in April 2018, "There's no one right way to parent or to be a mom." She continued: "We all are running in the same race and doing the best that we can. Motherhood is not a one size fits all — what works for one family may not work for the next. So who are we to judge another mom's choices or reasoning?"

So why not celebrate all the parents — like Philipps — who are out there doing their best and feeling free to laugh and be open about it? You're nailing it!

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

Keep Reading Show less