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Arnold Schwarzenegger may be one of the most famous people alive today. But as a child, the sport that vaulted him to fortune and glory was often the target of homophobia.

In his autobiography “Total Recall,” Schwarzenegger shared a story of how he was physically and emotionally abused by his parents who falsely assumed that he was gay because he covered his walls with pictures of male body builders.

Of course, Arnold would go on to become the sport’s most famous name ever before becoming even more famous as an action film star, and eventually, a politician.


But that’s not the point.

The point is he grew up in a time where it was considered normal for his parents to abuse him over the thing he loved because they were taught that being gay was somehow bad. In a later interview on the topic, Arnold went into more details. He told “60 Minutes” that his father used to hit him:

"He ran after me with a belt and beat me,” Schwarzenegger said. He added that his mother called their family doctor saying there was “something off” about their son and his interest in the male physique.

"I don't know if mum thought I was gay, or if she just thought there was something off. And 'let's catch it early,'" he said.

"She asked the doctor, 'Can you help me? I don't know if there's something wrong with my son because his wall is full of naked men. All of Arnold's friends have pictures of girls above their bed. And Arnold has no girls.'"

Schwarzenegger has been a long time supporter of LGBTQ rights, championing the Supreme Court’s marriage equality ruling and even famously shutting down a fan who made homophobic comments on his Facebook page back in 2015.

He hasn’t said if his own progressive views on sexuality were impacted by the abuse he suffered as a child but it’s clear Arnold is a complex person and someone who has once again become a largely beloved figure after his mixed tenure as governor of California and the subsequent revelation that he fathered a child outside his marriage.

Arnold isn’t perfect. But by opening up about his own vulnerabilities, he’s setting a perfect example for other men on the importance of avoiding toxic masculinity, homophobia and behaviors that ultimately only harm others and the individual who practices them.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

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Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


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