More

Where did Donald Trump get the idea that abortions happen on the due date?

His comments on abortion were a teensy bit inaccurate.

Where did Donald Trump get the idea that abortions happen on the due date?

In the third and final presidential debate, the candidates were finally asked about abortion.

With a seat on the Supreme Court waiting to be filled, the winner of the election will play a pretty huge role in determining the future of safe and legal abortion in the U.S. For months, abortion rights groups have been urging moderators to broach the subject. On Wednesday night, they got their wish.

The candidates' basic positions are known: Hillary Clinton is in favor of reinforcing the legal protections afforded by the Supreme Court's 1973 Roe v. Wade decision while Donald Trump has vowed to appoint justices he believes will overturn that decision.


Harder to discern was whatever Trump was trying to say about late-term abortions.

Wait, what? GIF from CNN/YouTube.

What Trump described wasn't an abortion at all. He described giving birth.

It should go without saying that no, you cannot get an abortion "in the ninth month on the final day." Even if that were possible, it's not legal, thanks to the 2003 Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act.

People on social media were quick to jump on Trump's claim about ripping babies from wombs.

While it's one thing to poke fun at Trump's statement, it's frightening to think that he's not alone in his misconceptions and spread of misinformation.

During a February Republican primary debate, Sen. Marco Rubio said, "Why doesn’t the media ask Hillary Clinton why she believes that all abortions should be legal, even on the due date of that unborn child?" (She doesn't.)

Meanwhile, Carly Fiorina went with this graphic lie:

In a September 2015 debate, GOP candidate Carly Fiorina described a video that purported to show an abortion. No video that matches her description exists. GIF via CNN/YouTube.

Last month, Sen. Ted Cruz claimed that Hillary Clinton "supports unlimited abortion on demand up until the moment of birth, including partial-birth abortion, with taxpayer funding." (She doesn't.)

The truth is that just 1.2% of abortions occur after 20 weeks of pregnancy, many of which are wanted pregnancies that either involve a threat to the life of the mother or would be fatal for the fetus.

There's a lot of stigma surrounding abortion, and misrepresenting what abortion actually is doesn't help anyone.

Whatever your position on abortion — whether you're of the mindset that it should be legal in all instances, in some instances, or not at all — can we at least agree that these arguments are best made when they are based in fact? There is no such thing as a nine-month abortion, nor are there videos showing brains being harvested.

Misrepresenting those who do need a late-term abortion (for whatever reason) doesn't help advance political discourse either. And conflating birth by cesarean section with a partial-birth abortion makes you look a tiny bit on the foolish side.

Courtesy of Movemeant Foundation

True

Have you ever woken up one day and wondered if you were destined to do more in your life? Or worried you didn't take that shot at your dream?

FOX's new show "The Big Leap." is here to show you that all you need to take that second chance is the confidence to do so.

Watch as a group of diverse underdogs from all different walks of life try to change their lives by auditioning for a reality TV dance show, finding themselves on an emotional journey when suddenly thrust into the spotlight. And they're not letting the fact that they don't have the traditional dancer body type, age, or background hold them back.

Unfortunately, far too many people lack this kind of confidence. That's why FOX is partnering with the Movemeant Foundation, an organization whose whole mission is to teach women and girls that fitness and physical movement is essential to helping them develop self-confidence, resilience, and commitment with communities of like-minded girls.

Keep Reading Show less
Most Shared

One little girl took pictures of her school lunches. The Internet responded — and so did the school.

If you listened to traditional news media (and sometimes social media), you'd begin to think the Internet and technology are bad for kids. Or kids are bad for technology. Here's a fascinating alternative idea.

True
Norton

This article originally appeared on 03.31.15

Kids can innovate, create, and imagine in ways that are fresh and inspiring — when we "allow" them to do so, anyway. Despite the tendency for parents to freak out because their kids are spending more and more time with technology in schools, and the tendency for schools themselves to set extremely restrictive limits on the usage of such technology, there's a solid argument for letting them be free to imagine and then make it happen.

It's not a stretch to say the kids in this video are on the cutting edge. Some of the results he talks about in the video at the bottom are quite impressive.

Keep Reading Show less