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Where did Donald Trump get the idea that abortions happen on the due date?

His comments on abortion were a teensy bit inaccurate.

In the third and final presidential debate, the candidates were finally asked about abortion.

With a seat on the Supreme Court waiting to be filled, the winner of the election will play a pretty huge role in determining the future of safe and legal abortion in the U.S. For months, abortion rights groups have been urging moderators to broach the subject. On Wednesday night, they got their wish.

The candidates' basic positions are known: Hillary Clinton is in favor of reinforcing the legal protections afforded by the Supreme Court's 1973 Roe v. Wade decision while Donald Trump has vowed to appoint justices he believes will overturn that decision.


Harder to discern was whatever Trump was trying to say about late-term abortions.

Wait, what? GIF from CNN/YouTube.

What Trump described wasn't an abortion at all. He described giving birth.

It should go without saying that no, you cannot get an abortion "in the ninth month on the final day." Even if that were possible, it's not legal, thanks to the 2003 Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act.

People on social media were quick to jump on Trump's claim about ripping babies from wombs.

While it's one thing to poke fun at Trump's statement, it's frightening to think that he's not alone in his misconceptions and spread of misinformation.

During a February Republican primary debate, Sen. Marco Rubio said, "Why doesn’t the media ask Hillary Clinton why she believes that all abortions should be legal, even on the due date of that unborn child?" (She doesn't.)

Meanwhile, Carly Fiorina went with this graphic lie:

In a September 2015 debate, GOP candidate Carly Fiorina described a video that purported to show an abortion. No video that matches her description exists. GIF via CNN/YouTube.

Last month, Sen. Ted Cruz claimed that Hillary Clinton "supports unlimited abortion on demand up until the moment of birth, including partial-birth abortion, with taxpayer funding." (She doesn't.)

The truth is that just 1.2% of abortions occur after 20 weeks of pregnancy, many of which are wanted pregnancies that either involve a threat to the life of the mother or would be fatal for the fetus.

There's a lot of stigma surrounding abortion, and misrepresenting what abortion actually is doesn't help anyone.

Whatever your position on abortion — whether you're of the mindset that it should be legal in all instances, in some instances, or not at all — can we at least agree that these arguments are best made when they are based in fact? There is no such thing as a nine-month abortion, nor are there videos showing brains being harvested.

Misrepresenting those who do need a late-term abortion (for whatever reason) doesn't help advance political discourse either. And conflating birth by cesarean section with a partial-birth abortion makes you look a tiny bit on the foolish side.

Education

Teacher of the year explains why he's leaving district in unforgettable 3-minute speech

"I'm leaving in hopes that I can regain the ability to do the job that I love."

Lee Allen

For all of our disagreements in modern American life, there are at least a few things most of us can agree on. One of those is the need for reform in public education. We don't all agree on the solutions but many of the challenges are undeniable: retaining great teachers, reducing classroom size and updating the focus of student curriculums to reflect the ever-changing needs of a globalized workforce.

And while parents, politicians and activists debate those remedies, one voice is all-too-often ignored: that of teachers themselves.

This is why a short video testimony from a teacher in the Atlanta suburb of Gwinnett County went viral recently. After all, it's hard to deny the points made by someone who was just named teacher of the year and used the occasion to announce why he will be leaving the very school district that just honored him with that distinction.

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Joy

Tea time: how this boutique blends cultures from around the world

Ethically sourced, modern clothes for kids that embrace adventure, inspire connections and global thinking.

The Tea Collection combines philanthropic efforts with a deep rooted sense of multiculturalism into each of their designs so that kids can grow up with global sensibilities. They make clothes built to last with practicality and adventure in mind. But why "Tea"?

Let's spill it. Tea is a drink shared around the world with people from all different cultures. It is a common thread that weaves the world together. The Tea Collection was born from a love of travel and a love of sharing tea with different people in different places. Inspired by patterns from around the world, these clothes help children develop a familiarity with global communities.

Tea sources their materials ethically and ensures that each of their partners abide to strict codes of conduct. They have a zero-tolerance policy for anything "even slightly questionable" and make sure that they regularly visit their manufacturing partners to ensure that they're supporting positive working conditions.

Since 2003, The Tea Collection has partnered with the Global Fund for Children and has invested in different grassroots organizations that create community empowered programs to uplift kids in need. They donate 10% of their proceeds and have already contributed over $500,000 to different organizations such as: The Homeless Prenatal Program (San Francisco, CA, USA), Door of Faith Orphanage (Baja California, Mexico), Little Sisters Fund (Nepal) and others in Peru, Sri Lanka, India, Italy and Haiti.

But the best part about the Tea Collection? They're also an official member of the Kidizen Rewear Collective, which believes that clothes should stretch far beyond one child's use. They have their own external site for their preloved clothes that makes rewearing affordable. Families can trade in gently used Tea clothes and receive discounts for future products. Shopping the site helps keep clothes out of land fills and reduces the environmental impact of the fashion industry.

By creating heirloom style clothing made to last families can buy, sell, and trade clothes that can be reworn again and again. Because "new to you" doesn't always have to mean never been worn. And let's be honest, we all know how fast kids grow! Shopping preloved clothes is a great way to keep styles fresh without harming the environment or feeling guilty about not getting the most out of certain styles.

But don't just take our word for it! Head over to the Tea Collection and see for yourself!

Upworthy has earned revenue through a partnership and/or may earn a portion of sales revenue from purchases made through links on our site.

Golden retriever has cutest reaction to sister walking.

Here at Upworthy we look for stories that will make you smile and warm your heart and, let’s face it, we could all use a little help in the smile department these days. When we ran across this ridiculously sweet story on The Dodo about a golden retriever and his little human sister, we simply had to share it with you. Taco is a 3-year-old golden retriever who has been lovingly waiting for his new baby sister, Vanora, to be able to play with him, and the day has finally come.

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