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What are the chefs at Restlos Glücklich serving today? Waste.

Food waste that is.

This Berlin restaurant is giving blemished ingredients a second chance by turning them into exquisite, mouthwatering meals.


Chef Daniel Roick holds a creation made from discarded groceries. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

Restlos Glücklich (which loosely translates to "completely happy") works closely with an organic grocery store chain to procure its ingredients.

Most of the bread and produce they receive is imperfect and might otherwise languish on the shelf. And incorrect deliveries can result in accidental surplus, so the restaurant puts that to use too.


Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

From there, chefs let the ingredients inspire appetizing and inventive vegetarian dishes.

Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

And they serve them in the restaurant Wednesday through Saturday.


Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

There's even a three-course fine-dining option available on the weekends, where you might enjoy these bite-sized appetizers...

Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

...or this delectable entree — deep-fried sesame balls in carrot sauce. Yum!

Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

From end to end, the process has an eye toward conservation and sustainability.

Not only does the restaurant work to minimize food waste, workers also pick up the daily haul on bicycles.

Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

And their effort doesn't end with the restaurant. The staff hosts cooking classes to help kids and adults learn to cook more sustainably using ingredients they may already have.

Efforts like Restlos Glücklich highlight the moral, environmental, and economic impact of food waste.

Each year, around $1 trillion in food is wasted in production or consumption (what you scrape off your plate or leave behind in a restaurant). That's about one-third of all the food produced worldwide!

Volunteer workers sort food waste and rubbish for recycling at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images.

In the U.S. alone, each person contributes over an estimated 20 pounds of food waste per month. It's no wonder organic material is the second-most common item in our overcrowded landfills.

And all of this while millions go without. There's got to be a better way.

That's why it's important to take responsibility for our production, consumption, and waste habits.

Whether it's using exploring how your local stores handle damaged or blemished goods, cooking more with less, starting a compost pile to give organic refuse another life, or stopping in to Restlos Glucklich, we're all capable of doing something to better our community and minimize waste.

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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