Watch Michelle Obama 'shake it off' with a 2-year-old fan in this adorable video.

On March 1, a photo of a little girl staring at Michelle Obama's new portrait at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery went viral.

Taken by a North Carolina man named Ben Hines, the image captured a 2-year-old girl named Parker Curry in a moment of awe. Hines' Facebook post, in which he said he was "delighted to wait in line behind this fellow art lover & hopeful patriot," went mega-viral, racking up tens of thousands of shares and melting the hearts of everyone in its path.

On its own, that's a really freakin' cute story, but it gets even better — a lot better.


Donna Hines & I made a pilgrimage today and we were delighted to wait in line behind this fellow art lover & hopeful patriot.

Posted by Ben Hines on Thursday, March 1, 2018

On March 5, Parker and her mom, Jessica, appeared on BuzzFeed's AM to DM show on Twitter. "I want to see [Michelle Obama]!" Parker said.

"I want you to see Michelle Obama too," added AM to DM host Saeed Jones. "What would you say to her?"

"She's a queen!" Parker replied. Again, this is just major cuteness overload — but this story isn't done just yet.

On March 6, Michelle Obama(!!!) posted a video of her dancing with little Parker.

"Parker, I'm so glad I had the chance to meet you today (and for the dance party)!" wrote the former first lady. "Keep on dreaming big for yourself ... and maybe one day I'll proudly look up at a portrait of you!"

The short clip shows the two rocking out to Taylor Swift's "Shake It Off" while Jessica smiles in the background.

The heart-melting cuteness of the story aside, this is exactly what Obama was talking about during the portrait's unveiling.

One of the most iconic moments of Obama's speech at the unveiling was when she talked about why representation matters — especially to young girls.

"I'm also thinking of all the young people, particularly girls and girls of color, who will see an image of someone who looks like them hanging on the wall in this great American institution," she said. "I know the impact that will have on their lives, because I was one of those girls."

Less than a month after going public and the portrait is already inspiring girls to dream big.

Michelle Obama looks on as her portrait is unveiled on Feb. 12. Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.