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On March 1, a photo of a little girl staring at Michelle Obama's new portrait at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery went viral.

Taken by a North Carolina man named Ben Hines, the image captured a 2-year-old girl named Parker Curry in a moment of awe. Hines' Facebook post, in which he said he was "delighted to wait in line behind this fellow art lover & hopeful patriot," went mega-viral, racking up tens of thousands of shares and melting the hearts of everyone in its path.

On its own, that's a really freakin' cute story, but it gets even better — a lot better.


Donna Hines & I made a pilgrimage today and we were delighted to wait in line behind this fellow art lover & hopeful patriot.

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Ben Hines on Thursday, March 1, 2018

On March 5, Parker and her mom, Jessica, appeared on BuzzFeed's AM to DM show on Twitter. "I want to see [Michelle Obama]!" Parker said.

"I want you to see Michelle Obama too," added AM to DM host Saeed Jones. "What would you say to her?"

"She's a queen!" Parker replied. Again, this is just major cuteness overload — but this story isn't done just yet.

On March 6, Michelle Obama(!!!) posted a video of her dancing with little Parker.

"Parker, I'm so glad I had the chance to meet you today (and for the dance party)!" wrote the former first lady. "Keep on dreaming big for yourself ... and maybe one day I'll proudly look up at a portrait of you!"

The short clip shows the two rocking out to Taylor Swift's "Shake It Off" while Jessica smiles in the background.

The heart-melting cuteness of the story aside, this is exactly what Obama was talking about during the portrait's unveiling.

One of the most iconic moments of Obama's speech at the unveiling was when she talked about why representation matters — especially to young girls.

"I'm also thinking of all the young people, particularly girls and girls of color, who will see an image of someone who looks like them hanging on the wall in this great American institution," she said. "I know the impact that will have on their lives, because I was one of those girls."

Less than a month after going public and the portrait is already inspiring girls to dream big.

Michelle Obama looks on as her portrait is unveiled on Feb. 12. Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Democracy

The Onion filed a Supreme Court brief. It's both hilariously serious and seriously hilarious.

Who else could call the judiciary 'total Latin dorks' while making a legitimate point?

The Onion's Supreme Court brief uses parody to defend parody.

Political satire and parody have been around for at least 2,400 years, as ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes satirized the way Athenian leaders conducted the Peloponnesian War and parodied the dramatic styles of his contemporaries, Aeschylus and Euripides.

Satire and parody are used to poke fun and highlight issues, using mimicry and sarcasm to create comedic biting commentary. No modern outlet has been more prolific on this front than The Onion, and the popular satirical news site is defending parody as a vital free speech issue in a legal filing with the U.S. Supreme Court.

The filing is, as one might expect from The Onion, as brilliantly hilarious as it is serious, using the same satirical style it's defending in the crafting of the brief itself.

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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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